Traductores

Conoce a todos los traductores de LALT.

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Honora Spicer is a poet and experiential educator. She holds an MA in History from Harvard University (2015) and a BA in History and Literature from Oxford University (2013). She teaches place-based US history at El Paso Community College. Her work has been published in The Rumpus, The Adroit Journal, and local publications, and translations are upcoming in Asymptote. honoraspicer.com


Ilan Stavans is the Lewis-Sebring Professor of Humanities and Latin American and Latino Culture at Amherst College and the publisher of Restless Books. His latest books are The Seventh Heaven: Travels through Jewish Latin America (2019), How Yiddish Changed America and How America Changed Yiddish (2020), And We Came Outside and Saw the Stars Again (2020), Popol Vuh: A Retelling (2020), and Selected Translations: Poems 2000-2020 (2021). He has translated Sor Juana, Neruda, and Borges into English, Emily Dickinson and Elizabeth Bishop into Spanish, Isaac Bashevis Singer from Yiddish, Yehuda Halevi from Hebrew, and Shakespeare, Cervantes, and Lewis Carroll into Spanglish.  His work, translated into twenty languages, has been adapted into film, radio, TV, and theater. 



Flávia Stefani is a writer and translator from Goiás, Brazil, currently living in San Francisco. She is pursuing an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and is an editor for Witness Magazine.



Auston Stiefer is a senior at the University of Oklahoma pursuing bachelor’s degrees in Spanish and Public Health. Also a Medical Humanities Scholar at OU with an emphasis in Literature and Medicine, he intends to study medicine after graduating in 2018. Interested in the role of literature as providing narrative elements of the human experience, Auston’s specific research and interest in public health has focused on the chronic health outcomes of historically marginalized groups within the US. He also works as an Editorial Intern for Latin American Literature Today.



Claire Storey is a literary translator based in the UK working from Spanish and German into English. In 2019, she received a Special Commendation from the Institute of Translation and Interpreting (ITI) in the ITI Awards category for Best Newcomer. The following January, she was shortlisted for the 2019 Goethe-Institut Award for New Translation. Claire participated as a panelist for the 2020 New Spanish Books program. She has a particular interest in books for children and young adults and is co-editor of the World Kid Lit Blog.
 



Tom Sullivan is a Spanish-to-English translator currently living in Madrid. He holds a B.A. in Latin American and Caribbean Studies from Brown University in Latin American and Caribbean Studies and an M.A. in Translation from the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. He is primarily interested in translating contemporary fiction and creative nonfiction, and he is always looking for interesting subtitling work. When he is not reading crime novels, drumming or listening to Latin American hip hop, he struggles to tame his facial hair.



Tom Sullivan is a Spanish-to-English translator currently living in Madrid. He holds a B.A. in Latin American and Caribbean Studies from Brown University in Latin American and Caribbean Studies and an M.A. in Translation from the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. He is primarily interested in translating contemporary fiction and creative nonfiction, and he is always looking for interesting subtitling work. When he is not reading crime novels, drumming or listening to Latin American hip hop, he struggles to tame his facial hair.



Photo by Jim Beatty

Clare Sullivan is an Associate Professor of Spanish at the University of Louisville, where she teaches poetry and translation. She received a 2010 NEA Translation Grant to work with Natalia Toledo’s poetry. The resulting work, The Black Flower and Other Zapotec Poems (Phoneme Media, 2015), was short-listed for the Best Translated Book Award. Her translation of Alejandro Tarrab’s Litane is forthcoming from Cardboard House Press. 



Photo: MALBA

Fiona Sze-Lorrain’s most recent collection The Ruined Elegance (Princeton, 2016) was a finalist for the 2016 Los Angeles Times Book Prize and one of Library Journal’s “Best Poetry Books 2015.”  Her work was also shortlisted for the 2016 Best Translated Book Award and longlisted for the PEN Award in Translation for Poetry.  She was the inaugural writer-in-residence at MALBA [Museo de Arte Latinoamericano de Buenos Aires] in 2018.  She lives in Paris where she works as a zheng harpist and editor.



Jenna Tang works as a literary translator and she is fluent in four languages. She was born and raised in Taoyuan City, Taiwan. She received her MFA in Fiction from The New School in New York City. Her translation from the Mandarin Chinese has been published in Restless Books’ international anthology And We Came Outside and Saw the Stars Again.



Dr. Jorge Alberto Tapia Ortiz obtained his PhD in Latin American Literature from the University of Pittsburgh (2016). He is an academic and researcher specializing in contemporary indigenous literatures. He has published the following books: Hasta que muera el sol: Antología de escritoras y escritores indígenas bröran-térraba (2014), Educación comunidad y literatura: Condiciones para la emergencia de una literatura indígena contemporánea (caso bröran-térraba en Costa Rica (2019). He teaches literary workshops in Amerindian communities to promote the emergence of new writers, as well as the empowerment and recognition of ancestral epistemologies.

He has just finished his second postdoctoral year (August 2019) in the Masters of Amerindian Studies and Bilingual Education, Faculty of Philosophy, at the Autonomous University of Querétaro, where he also serves as professor and coordinator of the program. He is a member of the National System of Researchers of Mexico (SNI level I).


Gabriela Tumani is an international student at the University of Oklahoma from Sao Paulo, Brazil, currently in her sophomore year. She is majoring in journalism and minoring in international studies, and works as a news reporter for the OU Daily.



Will Vanderhyden is a freelance translator, with an MA in Literary Translation from the University of Rochester. He has translated the work of Carlos Labbé, Rodrigo Fresán, and Fernanda García Lao, among others. His translations have appeared in journals such as Two Lines, The Literary Review, The Scofield, and The Arkansas International. He has received fellowships from the NEA and the Lannan Foundation.



Will Vanderhyden is a freelance translator, with an MA in Literary Translation from the University of Rochester. He has translated the work of Carlos Labbé, Rodrigo Fresán, and Fernanda García Lao, among others. His translations have appeared in journals such as Two Lines, The Literary Review, The Scofield, and The Arkansas International. He has received fellowships from the NEA and the Lannan Foundation.



Adam Versényi is Chair and Professor of Dramaturgy in the Department of Dramatic Art at the University of North Carolina and Senior Dramaturg for PlayMakers Repertory Company.  A theatre scholar, dramaturg, critic, translator, and director, he has written widely on Latin American theatre, U.S. Latino/a theatre, dramaturgy, theatre production, and theatrical translation.  He is the founder and editor of The Mercurian: A Theatrical Translation Review. He has translated plays by Argentines Agustín Cuzzani and Griselda Gambaro, Mexican Sabina Berman, and is currently working on a translation of La dramaturgia del espacio, Griffero’s book of aesthetic theory.



Caren Vestal is currently pursuing a Master's in Spanish at the University of Texas at the Permian Basin while teaching at the High School level. She and her husband Will have two cats and two dogs. Caren has traveled to many places including Spain, Argentina, Peru, New Zealand and Holland, but she has a special place in her heart for the Spanish language and culture.



Sebastián Villagra Pizarro (Santiago, 1989) is a Translation Master’s student at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile with interests in literary translation and creative writing. In 2015 he won the Roberto Bolaño Prize with the short story "Tarde en amarillo" [Afternoon in yellow].   



Sebastián Villagra Pizarro (Santiago, 1989) is a Translation Master’s student at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile with interests in literary translation and creative writing. In 2015 he won the Roberto Bolaño Prize with the short story "Tarde en amarillo" [Afternoon in yellow].   



Sergio Waisman received his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley (2000), and an MA in Creative Writing from the University of Colorado, Boulder (1995). His areas of research and teaching include Latin American literature, literary theory and translation, comparative literature, and Jewish-Latin American literature. His book Borges and Translation: The Irreverence of the Periphery was published in English by Bucknell and in Argentina by Adriana Hidalgo (both in 2005). Sergio Waisman has translated six books of Latin American literature, including The Absent City by Ricardo Piglia (Duke Univ. Press), for which he received an NEA Translation Fellowship Award in 2000. His first novel, Leaving, was published in the U.S. in 2004 (Intelibooks), and in 2010 as Irse in Argentina (bajo la luna). His latest translations are The Underdogs by Mariano Azuela (Penguin Classics) and An Anthology of Spanish-American Modernismo (MLA, with Kelly Washbourne).



Jesse Ward graduated from the University of Oklahoma with a double major in Vocal Music and Spanish. His translation of Raúl Flores Iriarte appeared in a previous issue of Latin American Literature Today. 



Julie Ann Ward was born in Oklahoma in 1983. She is an assistant professor of twentieth- and twenty-first-century Latin American literature at the University of Oklahoma. Ward is a 2015-16 recipient of the OU Humanities Forum Fellowship, which supports her research on representations of borders in contemporary Mexican literature.


Sarah Warmker is a graduate student in the Department of Modern Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics of the University of Oklahoma.


Sarah Warmker is a graduate student in the Department of Modern Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics of the University of Oklahoma.



Kelly Washbourne is Professor of Spanish Translation at Kent State University. His publications include After-Dinner Conversation, by José Asunción Silva (University of Texas Press, 2005); An Anthology of Spanish American Modernismo (edited and co-translated, MLA, 2007); and Nobel Laureate Miguel Ángel Asturias' Legends of Guatemala (Latin American Literary Review Press, 2011), which was awarded an NEA Translation Fellowship. Autoepitaph: Selected Poems by Reinaldo Arenas (Camelly Cruz Martes, ed.; University Press of Florida, 2014), was longlisted for the 2015 PEN Award for Poetry in Translation. He co-edited the Routledge Handbook of Literary Translation with Ben Van Wyke (2018). 



Cecilia Weddell is a doctoral student at the Boston University Editorial Institute, where she is translating the literary journalism of Rosario Castellanos. She is an editorial assistant at Harvard Review and a contributing editor at the translation journal Pusteblume. She can be found online at ceciliaweddell.com.


Rachel Whalen (Buffalo, NY, 1997) is a teacher, poet, and playwright. They graduated from Cornell University with a BA in English Literature and minors in Spanish and Public Service Studies. They are currently pursuing a Masters of Fine Arts in Creative Writing at New York University, with a concentration in poetry.



Faye Williams recently completed a Masters in Audiovisual Translation and Popular Culture at City University, London. A summary of her dissertation on the process of publishing translated literature in the UK appeared in The Linguist magazine and she now works as a freelance literary translator.



Paul M. Worley is Associate Professor of Global Literature at Western Carolina University. He is the author of Telling and Being Told: Storytelling and Cultural Control in Contemporary Yucatec Maya Literatures (2013; oral performances recorded as part of this book project are available at tsikbalichmaya.org), and with Rita M. Palacios is co-author of the forthcoming Unwriting Maya Literature: Ts’íib as Recorded Knowledge (2019). He is a Fulbright Scholar, and 2018 winner of the Sturgis Leavitt Award from the Southeastern Council on Latin American Studies. In addition to his academic work, he has translated selected works by Indigenous authors such as Hubert Malina, Adriana López, and Ruperta Bautista, serves as editor-at-large for México for the journal of world literature in English translation, Asymptote, and as poetry editor for the North Dakota Quarterly.



Paul M. Worley is Associate Professor of Global Literature at Western Carolina University. He is the author of Telling and Being Told: Storytelling and Cultural Control in Contemporary Yucatec Maya Literatures (2013; oral performances recorded as part of this book project are available at tsikbalichmaya.org), and with Rita M. Palacios is co-author of the forthcoming Unwriting Maya Literature: Ts’íib as Recorded Knowledge (2019). He is a Fulbright Scholar, and 2018 winner of the Sturgis Leavitt Award from the Southeastern Council on Latin American Studies. In addition to his academic work, he has translated selected works by Indigenous authors such as Hubert Malina, Adriana López, and Ruperta Bautista, serves as editor-at-large for México for the journal of world literature in English translation, Asymptote, and as poetry editor for the North Dakota Quarterly.



Grady C. Wray is an associate professor of Latin American literature and Spanish at the University of Oklahoma. His major investigatory focus concerns Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz and other early-modern Hispanic women writers. Recently he has taken on several translation projects of contemporary poetry and fiction.


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