Traductores

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Conoce a todos los traductores de LALT.

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Sergio Waisman received his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley (2000), and an MA in Creative Writing from the University of Colorado, Boulder (1995). His areas of research and teaching include Latin American literature, literary theory and translation, comparative literature, and Jewish-Latin American literature. His book Borges and Translation: The Irreverence of the Periphery was published in English by Bucknell and in Argentina by Adriana Hidalgo (both in 2005). Sergio Waisman has translated six books of Latin American literature, including The Absent City by Ricardo Piglia (Duke Univ. Press), for which he received an NEA Translation Fellowship Award in 2000. His first novel, Leaving, was published in the U.S. in 2004 (Intelibooks), and in 2010 as Irse in Argentina (bajo la luna). His latest translations are The Underdogs by Mariano Azuela (Penguin Classics) and An Anthology of Spanish-American Modernismo (MLA, with Kelly Washbourne).



Jesse Ward graduated from the University of Oklahoma with a double major in Vocal Music and Spanish. His translation of Raúl Flores Iriarte appeared in a previous issue of Latin American Literature Today. 



Julie Ann Ward was born in Oklahoma in 1983. She is an assistant professor of twentieth- and twenty-first-century Latin American literature at the University of Oklahoma. Ward is a 2015-16 recipient of the OU Humanities Forum Fellowship, which supports her research on representations of borders in contemporary Mexican literature.


Sarah Warmker is a graduate student in the Department of Modern Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics of the University of Oklahoma.


Sarah Warmker is a graduate student in the Department of Modern Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics of the University of Oklahoma.



Kelly Washbourne is Professor of Spanish Translation at Kent State University. His publications include After-Dinner Conversation, by José Asunción Silva (University of Texas Press, 2005); An Anthology of Spanish American Modernismo (edited and co-translated, MLA, 2007); and Nobel Laureate Miguel Ángel Asturias' Legends of Guatemala (Latin American Literary Review Press, 2011), which was awarded an NEA Translation Fellowship. Autoepitaph: Selected Poems by Reinaldo Arenas (Camelly Cruz Martes, ed.; University Press of Florida, 2014), was longlisted for the 2015 PEN Award for Poetry in Translation. He co-edited the Routledge Handbook of Literary Translation with Ben Van Wyke (2018). 



Cecilia Weddell is a doctoral student at the Boston University Editorial Institute, where she is translating the literary journalism of Rosario Castellanos. She is an editorial assistant at Harvard Review and a contributing editor at the translation journal Pusteblume. She can be found online at ceciliaweddell.com.



Faye Williams recently completed a Masters in Audiovisual Translation and Popular Culture at City University, London. A summary of her dissertation on the process of publishing translated literature in the UK appeared in The Linguist magazine and she now works as a freelance literary translator.



Paul M. Worley is Associate Professor of Global Literature at Western Carolina University. He is the author of Telling and Being Told: Storytelling and Cultural Control in Contemporary Yucatec Maya Literatures (2013; oral performances recorded as part of this book project are available at tsikbalichmaya.org), and with Rita M. Palacios is co-author of the forthcoming Unwriting Maya Literature: Ts’íib as Recorded Knowledge (2019). He is a Fulbright Scholar, and 2018 winner of the Sturgis Leavitt Award from the Southeastern Council on Latin American Studies. In addition to his academic work, he has translated selected works by Indigenous authors such as Hubert Malina, Adriana López, and Ruperta Bautista, serves as editor-at-large for México for the journal of world literature in English translation, Asymptote, and as poetry editor for the North Dakota Quarterly.



Paul M. Worley is Associate Professor of Global Literature at Western Carolina University. He is the author of Telling and Being Told: Storytelling and Cultural Control in Contemporary Yucatec Maya Literatures (2013; oral performances recorded as part of this book project are available at tsikbalichmaya.org), and with Rita M. Palacios is co-author of the forthcoming Unwriting Maya Literature: Ts’íib as Recorded Knowledge (2019). He is a Fulbright Scholar, and 2018 winner of the Sturgis Leavitt Award from the Southeastern Council on Latin American Studies. In addition to his academic work, he has translated selected works by Indigenous authors such as Hubert Malina, Adriana López, and Ruperta Bautista, serves as editor-at-large for México for the journal of world literature in English translation, Asymptote, and as poetry editor for the North Dakota Quarterly.



Grady C. Wray is an associate professor of Latin American literature and Spanish at the University of Oklahoma. His major investigatory focus concerns Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz and other early-modern Hispanic women writers. Recently he has taken on several translation projects of contemporary poetry and fiction.



Frank Wynne is a literary translator from Ireland, the author of I Was Vermeer, and the translator of Cueto’s The Blue Hour.


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