Translators

Browse through all of the translators in LALT.

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Since 2004, Christina Miller has taught Spanish at the University of Oklahoma, where she was awarded the Provost’s Certificate of Distinction in Teaching Prize. In 2017, she received her Doctorate in Spanish from the University of Oklahoma with a dissertation titled: “Detectives That Read: The Role of Literature, Evolution and Resistance in the Neopolicial by Ramón Díaz Eterovic and Leonardo Padura Fuentes,” for which she was nominated for the Office of the Provost PhD Dissertation Prize for the best thesis defended in 2017. As a researcher, her main area of interest is the Latin American detective novel (20th and 21st centuries). She has presented in various national and international conferences such as: South Central Modern Languages Association Conference, The Southwest Council of Latin American Studies Conference and the Congreso Internacional de Literatura y Estudios Hispánicos. Her translations have been published in journals such asLatin American Literature Today (LALT) y World Literature Today (WLT).



Michelle Mirabella’s translations have appeared in Exchanges and Latin American Literature Today. She is currently pursuing an MA in translation and interpretation at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies in Monterey. She has roots in Pittsburgh, Chile, and New York.



Michelle Mirabella’s translations have appeared in Exchanges and Latin American Literature Today. She is currently pursuing an MA in translation and interpretation at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies in Monterey. She has roots in Pittsburgh, Chile, and New York.



Lourdes Molina is a professor of practice of Spanish at Southern Methodist University where she teaches Spanish language, Spanish American literature, and literary translation. Her translations have appeared in Cuba Counterpoints. She holds a BA and MA in Spanish from the University of Florida and a PhD in literary and translation studies from the University of Texas at Dallas. She is currently translating Lage’s La autopista: The Movie.



Will Morningstar is a freelance editor and translator from Boston, with a master’s degree in religion and anthropology from Harvard Divinity School. His translation work has appeared and is forthcoming in ReVista: The Harvard Review of Latin America and the Massachusetts Review.


Robin Myers is a translator and poet. She earned her Bachelor of English Literature from Swarthmore College, USA. She was named a Fellow of the American Literary Translators Association (ALTA) in 2009. Her poetry translations have been published in numerous international journals. 



Robin Myers is the author of several poetry collections published as bilingual editions in Mexico, Argentina, and Spain. Her translations have appeared in AnomalyBeloit Poetry Journal, Asymptote, the Los Angeles Review of Books, WaxwingInventory, and elsewhere. She has been a fellow of the American Literary Translators Association (ALTA) and as a resident translator at the Banff Literary Translation Centre (BILTC). Her translation of Ezequiel Zaidenwerg’s book La lírica está muerta / Lyric Poetry is Dead is forthcoming from Cardboard House Press in 2018.



Robin Myers is the author of several poetry collections published as bilingual editions in Mexico, Argentina, and Spain. Her translations have appeared in AnomalyBeloit Poetry Journal, Asymptote, the Los Angeles Review of Books, WaxwingInventory, and elsewhere. She has been a fellow of the American Literary Translators Association (ALTA) and as a resident translator at the Banff Literary Translation Centre (BILTC). Her translation of Ezequiel Zaidenwerg’s book La lírica está muerta / Lyric Poetry is Dead is forthcoming from Cardboard House Press in 2018.


Daniel Narváez (Caracas, 1981) is translator, interpreter, and language instructor. He is a graduate of the School of Modern Languages of the Central University of Venezuela (UCV), and he currently resides in Toronto, Canada.



José Ángel Navejas is the author of Illegal: Reflections of an Undocumented Immigrant (2014) and Invierno (2019). He has edited Palabras migrantes: 10 ensayistas mexican@s de Chicago (2018). His forthcoming title, Un mojado en Chicago y tres discursos inaugurales, will be published by katakana editores. Currently, he is a PhD candidate at the University of Illinois at Chicago.



In 2008, Hanna Niklewicz packed her bags and bid adieu to the United States, where she was born and raised.  The ten years plus she has spent in Guadalajara, Mexico have proven fulfilling and productive; she has written a collection of short stories, translated several short works of fiction from various Mexican writers (among them, Ignacio Mondaca), and in 2016, undertook a graduate degree in Translation & Interpretation at the Universidad Autónoma de Guadalajara.  She also realized that her family’s East European (Polish) heritage prepared her well for embracing the Mexican culture (she sees compelling parallels between the two).



Amy Olen is Assistant Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Her Ph.D. is in Spanish and Portuguese from The University of Texas at Austin. She holds Master’s Degrees in Translation Studies and Spanish and Portuguese, both from UW-Milwaukee. Her research interests include Latin American Indigenous writing and Translation Studies.



César Panza (Valencia, Venezuela, 1987) earned his undergraduate degree in Mathematics from the Universidad de Carabobo (UC). He is now a student in the Applied Mathematics Program of the same university, where he also teaches and researches. He is a poet, editor, and translator. He studied Philosophy at the Universidad Cehtral de Venezuela (UCV). He has translated poems by Aimé Césaire, Jacques Roumain, Eugène Guillevic, Aloysius Bertrand, Kenneth Rexroth, Wallace Stevens, Keorapetse Kgositsile, Wang Ping, Langston Hughes, Amiri Baraka, Charles Bernstein, Arthur Sze, George Oppen, and Michel Butor for online publications. He translated Bob Dylan’s Canciones 1962-1979 from the English (2017). His first book is Mercancías (2018). He is a member of the Editorial Board of the journal Poesía, published from the Universidad de Carabobo.



Nicolás Pérez Ferretti is a MScR in Hispanic Studies (U. of Edinburgh). He currently lives in Santiago, Chile, where he works as a freelance English-to-Spanish translator. His works include the anthology Humano Es by Philip K. Dick (Abducción Editorial, 2018), and many academic articles.



Nicolás Pérez Ferretti is a MScR in Hispanic Studies (U. of Edinburgh). He currently lives in Santiago, Chile, where he works as a freelance English-to-Spanish translator. His works include the anthology Humano Es by Philip K. Dick (Abducción Editorial, 2018), and many academic articles.



Beverly Pérez Rego is one of Venezuela’s most prominent translators and the author of five volumes of poetry: Artes del vidrio [Glass arts] (1992), Libro de cetrería [Book of falconry] (1994), Providencia [Providence] (1998), Grimorio [Grimoire] (2002) and Escurana [Darkness] (2004), collected in 2006 as Poesía reunida [Collected poetry] by Monte Ávila Editores. Her poems have appeared in numerous anthologies, and she has also published translations of Anne Waldman, Nathalie Handal, Louise Glück and Mark Strand. She received the Rafael Bolívar Coronado Biennial Literary Prize in Poetry and the Elías David Curiel Poetry Award. In 2010, she was a Fellow at the International Writing Program of the University of Iowa, where she later obtained an MFA in Translation. She lives in Caracas.



José Pérez Vogt (Santiago, 1986) is a Santiago-based freelance English-to-Spanish translator and a Translation Studies Professor at Universidad Tecnológica de Chile INACAP, specialized in the fields of translation pedagogy and Translation Environment Tools teaching. He is currently pursuing a Master's Degree in Translation at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. 



A native of Puerto Rico, Valeria Piña Fonseca holds a Master’s in Translation from the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey, and a Bachelor’s in Journalism from the University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus.



Luciana Pissolato has a Bachelor of Arts from the Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Brazil and a Master and PhD in Linguistics from the Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil. She is a researcher and professor in the Faculty of Humanities of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Her areas of specialty and research interest are: terminology, specialized translation, terminological metaphor, and corpus linguistics applied to translation studies.



Jeannine M. Pitas is a writer, translator, and professor of English and Spanish at University of Dubuque. Her translation of poetry by Uruguayan writer Marosa di Giorgio, I Remember Nightfall (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2017), was shortlisted for the National Translation Award. She has three translations forthcoming in 2019: Materia Prima (Ugly Duckling Presse) by Uruguayan poet Amanda Berenguer, translated collaboratively with seven other translators, Echo of the Park (Eulalia Books) by Argentine poet Romina Freschi, and Carnation and Tenebrae Candle (Cardboard House) by Marosa di Giorgio. 



Jeannine M. Pitas is a writer, translator, and professor of English and Spanish at University of Dubuque. Her translation of poetry by Uruguayan writer Marosa di Giorgio, I Remember Nightfall (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2017), was shortlisted for the National Translation Award. She has three translations forthcoming in 2019: Materia Prima (Ugly Duckling Presse) by Uruguayan poet Amanda Berenguer, translated collaboratively with seven other translators, Echo of the Park (Eulalia Books) by Argentine poet Romina Freschi, and Carnation and Tenebrae Candle (Cardboard House) by Marosa di Giorgio. 



Natalia Pommier is a freelance translator and interpreter, fluent in Spanish, English and French. She has lived and studied in Europe, Latin America and the United States and holds an M.A. in Conference Interpreting from the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. 



Hebe Powell spent part of her childhood in Argentina and has been a translator for five years. She has co-translated several novels with Nick Caistor, including two science-fiction works by the Cuban writer Augustín de Rojas. 



Jessica Powell has published dozens of translations of literary works by a wide variety of Latin American writers. She was the recipient of a 2011 National Endowment for the Arts Translation Fellowship in support of her translation of Antonio Benítez Rojo's novel, Woman in Battle Dress (City Lights, 2015), which was a finalist for the PEN Center USA Literary Award for Translation. Her translation of Wicked Weeds by Pedro Cabiya (Mandel Vilar Press, 2016), was named a finalist for the 2017 Best Translated Book Award and made the longlist for the 2017 National Translation Award. Her translation of Pablo Neruda's book-length poem, venture of the infinite man, was published by City Lights Books in October 2017. Her most recent translation, of Edna Iturralde's award-winning book, Green Was My Forest, was published by Mandel Vilar Press in September, 2018.



Photo: Daniel Siwek

Annette Prekker Levine, Associate Professor of Spanish and Latin American literature at Ithaca College, has published translations of fiction and poetry by Argentine and Chilean writers. She has also produced translations for the Argentine human rights archive, Memoria Abierta. She studied under translator Suzanne Jill Levine at UC Santa Barbara and co-edited UCSB’s first volume of the journal Translation (2005). Her book Cry for Me, Argentina (2008), grapples with Argentine dictatorship literature produced in the 1980s and 90s, with specific attention to fiction written by Aída Bortnik, Griselda Gambaro, and Tununa Mercado. 



Travis Price’s fiction has appeared in The Collagist, pioneertown, Clockhouse, and Toho Journal. He is currently working on a novel set in Uruguay, where he lived in 2018 while completing a Fulbright. Travis lives in Philadelphia. 


Margaret Randall (b. 1936, New York) lived in Cuba from 1969 to 1980. In 1970 and 2011 she was a judge of the Casa de las Américas literary contest. Her books include To Change the World: My Years in Cuba (2009) and Haydée Santamaría, Cuban Revolutionary: She Led by Transgression, just out from Duke University Press.



Guillermo Rebollo Gil (San Juan, 1979) is the author of several poetry and essay collections, including Fire island (The New Heave Ho, 2014) and Writing Puerto Rico: Our Decolonial Moment (Palgrave, 2018). As a translator, he has published I’ll trade you this island/Te cambio esta isla (Ediciones Aguadulce 2018), a bilingual selection of Cindy Jimenez Vera’s poetry, and Recetas naturales para el mundo fenomenal (Ediciones Aguadulce, 2017), a bilingual selection of Sommer Browning’s poems.



Michael Redzich is a graduate of the University of Oklahoma. He earned degrees in Spanish and Letters, and intends to pursue a legal education upon graduation. Michael came to OU in 2013 from Jackson, Wyoming, where he grew up with his parents and one brother. He spent the past two years living in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and looks forward to seeing more of Latin America: the places, the people, the literature, and more. 



Natalia Reyes is a writer and translator from California. She translates from Spanish and is pursuing her MFA in fiction at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop.


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