Translators

Browse through all of the translators in LALT.

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John Z. Komurki’s recent projects include Mexican Poets Go Home (Bongo Books), a bilingual anthology, as co-editor and translator, and Risomania (Niggli), as author. He is working on a study of printing in Mexico.



Denise Kripper is an Assistant Professor of Spanish at Lake Forest College, where she teaches courses on Latin American literature and Translation Studies. She holds a PhD in Literature and Cultural Studies from Georgetown University and a BA in literary translation from her native Argentina. She lives in Chicago, where she’s a member of the Third Coast Translators Collective.



Rosa María Lazo is a full-time associate professor and Vice Dean at the Faculty of Literature and Linguistics of the Pontificia Universidad Católica of Chile. She is also a professional English-French-Spanish translator.



Mark Leech lives in Oxford. His most recent chapbook, Borderlands, a follow-up to his Chang’an Poems, is published by Original Plus. He has published chapbooks of Spanish and Old English translations, and London Water, a sequence of long poems about London’s hidden rivers. He blogs at openfieldblog.wordpress.com. He won the Stephen Spender Prize in 2004 for his translation of the Old English poem The Dream of the Rood.



Mark Leech lives in Oxford. His most recent chapbook, Borderlands, a follow-up to his Chang’an Poems, is published by Original Plus. He has published chapbooks of Spanish and Old English translations, and London Water, a sequence of long poems about London’s hidden rivers. He blogs at openfieldblog.wordpress.com. He won the Stephen Spender Prize in 2004 for his translation of the Old English poem The Dream of the Rood.



Suzanne Jill Levine is General Editor of Penguin's paperback classics of Jorge Luis Borges' poetry and essays, and a noted translator of Latin American prose and poetry by distinguished writers such as Guillermo Cabrera Infante, Julio Cortázar, Carlos Fuentes, Jose Donoso, Manuel Puig, Severo Sarduy, and Adolfo Bioy Casares. Director of Translation Studies at UCSB, Levine is author of several books including The Subversive Scribe: Translating Latin American Fiction, and Manuel Puig and the Spiderwoman: His Life and Fictions. Her most recent published translation is Cristina Rivera Garza's The Taiga Syndrome (The Dorothy Project, 2018).



Suzanne Jill Levine is General Editor of Penguin's paperback classics of Jorge Luis Borges' poetry and essays, and a noted translator of Latin American prose and poetry by distinguished writers such as Guillermo Cabrera Infante, Julio Cortázar, Carlos Fuentes, Jose Donoso, Manuel Puig, Severo Sarduy, and Adolfo Bioy Casares. Director of Translation Studies at UCSB, Levine is author of several books including The Subversive Scribe: Translating Latin American Fiction, and Manuel Puig and the Spiderwoman: His Life and Fictions. Her most recent published translation is Cristina Rivera Garza's The Taiga Syndrome (The Dorothy Project, 2018).



Alexis Levitin has published forty-five books in translation, mostly poetry from Portugal, Brazil, and Ecuador.  In addition to three books by Salgado Maranhão, his work includes Clarice Lispector’s Soulstorm and Eugénio de Andrade’s Forbidden Words, both from New Directions. He has served as a Fulbright Lecturer at the Universities of Oporto and Coimbra, Portugal, The Catholic University in Guayaquil, Ecuador, and the Federal University of Santa Catarina, in Brazil and has held translation residencies at Banff, Canada, Straelen, Germany (twice), and the Rockefeller Foundation Study Center in Bellagio, Italy.



Brook Danielle Lillehaugen is a linguist specializing in indigenous languages of Mexico. Currently an assistant professor at Haverford College, she received her PhD in 2006 from UCLA. She has been working with speakers of Zapotec languages since 1999. Her first literary translation of Zapotec poetry was published in 2017 in Latin American Literary Review. For more information: http://brooklillehaugen.weebly.com/



David Lisenby lives in Kansas City, Missouri, where he teaches Spanish at William Jewell College. He has translated work by Cuban writers Abilio Estévez, Anna Lidia Vega Serova, and Gerardo Fulleda León. His publications have appeared in Revista Canadiense de Estudios HispánicosAfro-Hispanic Review, Latin American Theatre Review, and Cuba Counterpoints.



Yazmine Livinalli is a translator from Caracas, Venezuela. She graduated with her degree in Translation and Interpreting in English, French, and Spanish from the Universidad Central de Venezuela. She is also a public interpreter and took specialized courses on legal translation at the Universidad Metropolitana. She has performed simultaneous and consecutive interpreting at various types of conferences, both in Venezuela and internationally. She has worked as an independent translator for over twenty years. Although the majority of her work is in scientific and technical fields, she works with several outlets and civil associations on matters of general social interest.


Olivia Lott is a doctoral student in Hispanic Language & Literature at Washington University in St. Louis (United States), specializing in contemporary Spanish American poetry and literary translation.  In 2015-2016, she received a Fulbright grant to translate contemporary poetry from Colombia.  These translations have been published in journals in and beyond the United States, including Mantis, Sakura Review, Círculo de Poesía, La Raíz Invertida and Otro Páramo.  



Olivia Lott’s translations of Spanish American poetry have most recently appeared in or are forthcoming from Brooklyn Rail in TranslationThe Kenyon Review, MAKE Magazine, Spoon River Poetry ReviewWaxwing, and World Literature Today. She is the co-translator (with Barbara Jamison) of Cuban poet Soleida Ríos’s The Dirty Text (Kenning Editions, 2018). Lott is a Ph.D. Student and Olin Fellow in Hispanic Studies at Washington University in St. Louis, where she is writing a dissertation on translation, revolution, and Latin American neo-avant-garde poetry.



Christina MacSweeney was awarded the 2016 Valle Inclán Translation Prize for her translations of Valeria Luiselli’s The Story of My Teeth, and her translations of Daniel Saldaña París’s novel Among Strange Victims was a finalist in the 2017 Best Translated Book Award. In 2017 she published a translation of Elvira Navarro’s A Working Woman, followed in 2018 by Empty Set (Verónica Gerber Bicecci), and Tomb Song and The House of the Pain of Others (Julián Herbert), all of which have received critical acclaim. Her work has also been included in various anthologies of Latina American Literature. Christina also collaborated with Verónica Gerber Bicecci on the bilingual book Palabras migrantes / Migrant Words. Her translations of Bring Me the Head of Quentin Tarantino (Julián Herbert), On Lighthouses, a book-length essay by Jazmina Barrera, and Elvira Navarro’s short story collection Rabbit Island are forthcoming in 2020.



Chris Madison is a freelance translator living in California. He holds an MA in Spanish translation from the Middlebury Institute of International Studies. His translation of Rafael Rojas’ “Octavio Armand and Zequeira’s Hat” appeared in the November 2018 issue of Latin American Literature Today.



Carol Maier is Professor Emerita at Kent State University. She has translated work by Nuria Amat, Octavio Armand, Rosa Chacel, Severo Sarduy, and María Zambrano, among others. In addition, she has edited or co-edited two special issues and several collections of essays, including Between Language and Cultures: Translation and Cross-Cultural Texts, with Anuradha Dingwaney, and Literature and Translation: Teaching Issues and Reading Practices, with Françoise Massardier-Kenney. Currently, she is editing a volume in honor of the late Helen Lane, a translation of Armand’s Clinamen, and new work by and about Chacel. Her translations have received awards from the MLA, ALTA, and the Eugene M. Kayden Endowment. She serves as the book review editor for TIS: Translation and Interpreting Studies and is a member of the advisory board of The Translator, TTR, and the book series Literatures, Cultures, Translation (Bloomsbury).



Carol Maier is Professor Emerita at Kent State University. She has translated work by Nuria Amat, Octavio Armand, Rosa Chacel, Severo Sarduy, and María Zambrano, among others. In addition, she has edited or co-edited two special issues and several collections of essays, including Between Language and Cultures: Translation and Cross-Cultural Texts, with Anuradha Dingwaney, and Literature and Translation: Teaching Issues and Reading Practices, with Françoise Massardier-Kenney. Currently, she is editing a volume in honor of the late Helen Lane, a translation of Armand’s Clinamen, and new work by and about Chacel. Her translations have received awards from the MLA, ALTA, and the Eugene M. Kayden Endowment. She serves as the book review editor for TIS: Translation and Interpreting Studies and is a member of the advisory board of The Translator, TTR, and the book series Literatures, Cultures, Translation (Bloomsbury).



Annita Costa Malufe (São Paulo, 1975) is the author of five books of poetry—Um caderno para coisas práticas (7Letras, 2016), Quando não estou por perto (7Letras, 2012), Como se caísse devagar (Editora 34, 2008), Nesta cidade e abaixo de teus olhos (7Letras, 2007), and Fundos para dias de chuva (7Letras, 2004)—as well as two books of criticism on the Brazilian poets Ana Cristina César and Marcos Siscar. She received her PhD in literary theory from the University of Campinas and currently teaches at the Pontifical Catholic University of São Paulo.
 



Mireille Mariansky is studying Translation and Interpretation at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. She previously studied interpretation at York University in Toronto and holds a BA from the University of California, Davis. Born in Mexico City to Mexican and Argentine parents, Mireille now lives in northern California.



Ana Márques is originally from Valencia, Spain, where she earned a degree in Translation and Interlinguistic Communication in 2015. After two years of professional development as a translator and manager of translation projects in Spain, she moved to the United States in fall of 2017 to begin her graduate studies. She is currently an MA student of Hispanic Literature at the University of Oklahoma, and she teaches Spanish language classes at the same institution.



Kit Maude is a translator based in Buenos Aires. He has translated dozens of Latin American writers for a wide array of publications and writes reviews for ÑOtra Parte, and the Times Literary Supplement.  



Photo: Camila Valdés

Megan McDowell has translated many of the most important Latin American writers working today, including Samanta Schweblin and Alejandro Zambra. Her translations have won the English PEN award and the Premio Valle-Inclán, and have been nominated three times for the International Booker Prize. Her short story translations have been featured in The New YorkerThe Paris ReviewTin HouseMcSweeney’s, and Granta, among others. In 2020 she won an Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. She lives in Santiago, Chile. 



Photo: Lauren Ellemore

Victor Meadowcroft grew up at the foot of the Sintra Mountains in Portugal and translates from Portuguese and Spanish. He is a graduate of the MA in Literary Translation programme at the University of East Anglia and, with Margaret Jull Costa, has produced co-translations of stories by the Portuguese author Agustina Bessa-Luís which appeared in the collection ‘Take Six: Six Portuguese Women Writers’. He is currently working with Anne McLean on a translation of the novella ‘Señor que no conoce la luna’ by Colombian author Evelio Rosero.



Photo: Lauren Ellemore

Victor Meadowcroft grew up at the foot of the Sintra Mountains in Portugal and translates from Portuguese and Spanish. He is a graduate of the MA in Literary Translation programme at the University of East Anglia and, with Margaret Jull Costa, has produced co-translations of stories by the Portuguese author Agustina Bessa-Luís which appeared in the collection ‘Take Six: Six Portuguese Women Writers’. He is currently working with Anne McLean on a translation of the novella ‘Señor que no conoce la luna’ by Colombian author Evelio Rosero.



Consuelo Méndez (Caracas, 1952) is a retired university level art professor at the former Institute of Superior Studies of Fine Arts Armando Reverón, now University of the Arts, UNEARTES, in the area of Experimental Drawing, Body Art and Performance. In Venezuela, she has been awarded prizes for her artwork in the Michelena National Show (1981, 1983), the Municipal Art Prize of Caracas (1984), the Graphic Biennal of Maracaibo (1990), and at the Miniature Graphics Competition TAGA (1982, 1990, 2004). She has participated in numerous exhibitions in countries like South Korea, Bulgaria, Puerto Rico, Colombia, the United States, Cuba, México, Poland, and Belgium. She researches the plastic and visual arts: painting, drawing, photography, graphic arts, at the same time demonstrating special interests in bookmaking and works on paper. The relationship between the body and the visual arts has become more and more relevant in her personal expression and her teaching, opening the way to her creative research. Also, she has begun to develop a line of work in art therapy. She belongs to the Pielforma Group, a laboratory experience in body-art research.



Jessie Mendez Sayer is a literary translator, editor, and former literary scout. She studied history and Spanish at the University of Edinburgh.



Alejandra Menichetti Caballero (Santiago, 1994) is an editor and researcher who completed studies in Literature at Universidad Finis Terrae. In 2017 she worked as a coeditor for El Imposible Mono Místico [The impossible mystical monkey] (Editorial Piedrangular) and in 2018 she published Historieta Política en Chile: Entrevistas a investigadores y creadores nacionales [Political comics in Chile: interviews with Chilean researchers and creators] (Konëmpan). She is currently pursuing a Master's Degree in Translation at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.



Lily Meyer is a writer and translator living in Washington, DC. She is a recipient of a 2018 Washington, DC Arts and Humanities Fellowship, and her work has appeared in NPR, Electric Literature, Bogotá 39, and more.



Photo: Vicki Conti

Seth Michelson is a poet, translator, and professor of poetry at Washington and Lee University. He loves to cook, eat, and travel. He has been awarded the International Book Award in the Poetry category (2013). His recent verse collections include Swimming Through Fire (2017) and Eyes Like Broken Windows (2012). He has translated works including Ghetto by Tamara Kamenszain, The Red Song by Melisa Machado, Poems from the Disaster by Zulema Moret, and roly poly by Victoria Estol. He has been lucky enough to live in many important places in the world, such as Montevideo, Buenos Aires, Madrid, Los Angeles, San Diego, New York, Sydney, and Helsinki. He currently lives in Lexington, Virginia, where he teaches at Washington and Lee University. Michelson regularly visits schools, festivals, community centers, and artistic groups throughout the world.



Photo: Vicki Conti

Seth Michelson is a poet, translator, and professor of poetry at Washington and Lee University. He loves to cook, eat, and travel. He has been awarded the International Book Award in the Poetry category (2013). His recent verse collections include Swimming Through Fire (2017) and Eyes Like Broken Windows (2012). He has translated works including Ghetto by Tamara Kamenszain, The Red Song by Melisa Machado, Poems from the Disaster by Zulema Moret, and roly poly by Victoria Estol. He has been lucky enough to live in many important places in the world, such as Montevideo, Buenos Aires, Madrid, Los Angeles, San Diego, New York, Sydney, and Helsinki. He currently lives in Lexington, Virginia, where he teaches at Washington and Lee University. Michelson regularly visits schools, festivals, community centers, and artistic groups throughout the world.


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