Translators

Browse through all of the translators in LALT.

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Gillian Esquivia-Cohen, a dual citizen of the United States and Colombia, is a writer and translator. She is currently an MFA candidate at the Institute of American Indian Arts, where she is working on a novel. 



Photo: Blanca Irene Arbelaez

Miguel Falquez-Certain is the author of six volumes of poetry, six plays, a novella, and a book of short fiction, Triacas, for which he has received several awards. He has a B.A. in Spanish and French (Hunter College, 1980), did his Ph.D. course work in Comparative Literature at New York University (1981-85), and studied the art and theory of translation with Richard Howard and André Lefebvre at NYU. ATA-certified, and a PEN Club and Proz.com member, he has lived in NYC since the seventies working as a translator in five languages.



Slava Faybysh is a freelance translator based in Chicago. His translations can be viewed on Asymptote, Lunch Ticket, and Palabras Errantes.



Ana María Ferreira is an assistant professor at the University of Indianapolis, where she teaches and researches on Latin American Literature and Culture.  Ferreira graduated from Georgetown University, and she is interested in colonial and postcolonial indigenous writers.  For many years, Ferreira has collaborated with Estercilia Simanca, and she dedicated two chapters of her PhD dissertation to her work.  To Professor Ferreira, indigenous literature has been, from the 15th century to this day, not just a form of preserving traditional indigenous stories and cultures, but also a form of resistance to colonization.  She is also a regular contributor to the Colombian magazine Razón Pública.



Paul Filev translates from Macedonian and Spanish. He was awarded a Literary Translation Fellowship by Dalkey Archive Press in 2015. His translations include Sasho Dimoski’s Alma Mahler (Dalkey Archive Press, 2018) and Eduardo Sánchez Rugeles’s Blue Label (Turtle Point Press, 2018). He lives in Melbourne. www.paulfilev.com



Ezra E. Fitz began his literary life at Princeton University, studying under the tutelage of James Irby, C.K. Williams, David Bellos, and Jonathan Galassi. His senior thesis was described by the late Robert Fagles as "a heartening manifesto" on the art of translation. Since then, he has worked with Grammy winning musician Juanes, Emmy winning journalist Jorge Ramos, and the king of soccer himself, Pelé. His translations of contemporary Latin American literature by Alberto Fuguet and Eloy Urroz have been praised by The New York Times, The Washington Post, The New Yorker, and The Believer, among other publications. His work has appeared in The Boston Review, Harper's Magazine, and Words Without Borders, he has been awarded grants from the Mexican National Fund for Culture and Arts (FONCA), and he was a 2010 Resident at the Banff International Literary Translation Centre in Alberta, Canada.



Caro Friszman has a translation degree from the Instituto en Lenguas Vivas Juan Ramón Fernández in Buenos Aires, Argentina. She has worked as a freelance translator in a variety of fields, particularly in social science and audiovisual translation. She taught social science translation at the Belgrano University in Buenos Aires. She has collaborated both as a translator and an editor in several published translations; most recently among them are Licensed Larseny, by Nicholas Hildyard, and Exciting the Industry of Mankind, by George Caffentzis. She is part of the translators’ roster at the UN.



Caro Friszman has a translation degree from the Instituto en Lenguas Vivas Juan Ramón Fernández in Buenos Aires, Argentina. She has worked as a freelance translator in a variety of fields, particularly in social science and audiovisual translation. She taught social science translation at the Belgrano University in Buenos Aires. She has collaborated both as a translator and an editor in several published translations; most recently among them are Licensed Larseny, by Nicholas Hildyard, and Exciting the Industry of Mankind, by George Caffentzis. She is part of the translators’ roster at the UN.



Lorenza Garcia was born and brought up in England. She left the UK in her early twenties and spent two decades living and working in Iceland, Spain, and France. Since 2006 she has translated and co-translated over forty novels and works of nonfiction from the French, Spanish, and Icelandic. She currently lives in Wiltshire.



Anthony L. Geist is Professor of Spanish and Comparative Literature at the University of Washington (Seattle). Geist has taught previously at Princeton, the University of Texas (San Antonio), and Dartmouth. He has published widely on twentieth-century Spanish and Latin American poetry, and has translated the Spanish poets Jorge Guillén, Federico García Lorca, Álvaro Salvador, Luis García Montero and Luis Muñoz, as well as the Peruvian Edgar O’Hara. He is currently at work on an illustrated, trilingual edition of Rafael Alberti’s Roma, peligro para caminantes [Rome, danger for walkers]. More recently he has begun working in visual studies, including photoessays, art exhibits and documentary film. He considers himself fortunate that two of his great passions–poetry and the Spanish Civil War—are also his profession.



Dick Gerdes (dick.gerdes@gmail.com) is an award-winning translator who lives in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He has translated works from the Spanish by important novelists such as Alfredo Bryce Echenique, Ana María Shua, Diamela Eltit, and Gonzalo Celorio, among others.



Juliana Giusti Cavallin is an 11th-grade student at Norman High School. Studying in Venezuela, Spain, and at present, in the United States, she hopes to further her secondary education and continuing into a future undergraduate degree. She is currently one of the editors of The Trail, Norman High School's yearbook and has been published on Soupstone Norman High School's literary magazine.



Letícia Goellner is a researcher and professor at the Faculty of Letters of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Postdoc in Translation Studies (Literary translation) from the Universidade de Brasília, Brazil. PhD in Translation Studies from the Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Brazil. She has been working, since 2012, on the academic journal Cadernos de Tradução (SciELO collection) as assistant editor. Her areas of specialty and research interest are: Translation theory, Translation Studies, Translation of Latin American Literature, and Literary translation. 



Letícia Goellner is a researcher and professor at the Faculty of Letters of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Postdoc in Translation Studies (Literary translation) from the Universidade de Brasília, Brazil. PhD in Translation Studies from the Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Brazil. She has been working, since 2012, on the academic journal Cadernos de Tradução (SciELO collection) as assistant editor. Her areas of specialty and research interest are: Translation theory, Translation Studies, Translation of Latin American Literature, and Literary translation. 



Cuban-American in unequal parts, Edward Gonzalez studied excercise physiology and linguistics, also in unequal parts. He is bilingual in Spanish and English and, in a way, in the languages of the physical and the verbal. When he's not teaching English or playing with his two daughters, he writes, mostly on his cell phone. He promotes the idea of "doing poetry," or writing as a form of creative excercise (aluding to the Greek idea of the poet as a do-er), and that "doing poetry" is within reach of anyone who wants to create. For him, "doing poetry" is exploring the connections between the individual, their language, their surroundings, and all the interactions that arise as a consequence of these things. His verse collection Sin Zapatos / Shoes Off (Mago Editores, 2018) "does poetry" in both his languages, written partly in English and partly in Spanish. He teaches at the in the Department of Letters of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.


Carlos F. Grigsby (1988) is a poet and translator. He has published the verse collection Una oscuridad brillando en la claridad que la claridad no logra comprender [A darkness shining in the brightness that the brightness cannot understand] (Visor, 2008). He is completing a doctorate in literary translation and Spanish American literature at the University of Oxford.



Photo: Carlos Ancheta

Arturo Gutiérrez Plaza is a poet, essayist, and university professor. He serves as the Associate Editor and Book Reviews Editor of Latin American Literature Today

He has published the following verse collections: Al margen de las hojas (Caracas: Monte Ávila, 1991), De espaldas al río (Caracas: El pez soluble, 1999), Principios de Contabilidad (Mexico: Conaculta, 2000), Pasado en Limpio (Caracas: Equinoccio, bid&co, 2006), and Cuidados intensivos (Caracas: Lugar Común, 2014). His books of essays, literary research, and anthologies include: Lecturas desplazadas: Encuentros hispanoamericanos con Cervantes y Góngora(Caracas: Equinoccio, 2009), Itinerarios de la ciudad en la poesía venezolana: una metáfora del cambio (Caracas: Fundación para la Cultura Urbana, 2010), Las palabras necesarias. Muestra antológica de poesía venezolana del siglo XX(Santiago de Chile: LOM, 2010), and Formas en fuga. Antología poética de Juan Calzadilla(Caracas: Biblioteca Ayacucho, 2011).

Among other prizes, he has won: the Mariano Picón Salas prize for poetry (Venezuela) in 1995, the Premio Hispanoamericano de Poesía Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (Mexico), in 1999, and the Premio Transgenérico de la Fundación para la Cultura Urbana (Venezuela) in 2009. He is a retired senior professor at the Universidad Simón Bolívar (Venezuela), and he currently works as a Distinguished Visiting Professor at the University of Oklahoma.



Luis Guzmán Valerio has a Ph.D. in Latin American, Iberian, and Latino Cultures from The Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His creative writing has appeared in Chiricú. His literary translations have been published in BODY Literature, Delos, FIVE:2:ONE, Sargasso, and Translators’ Corner. He lives in New York City.



Daniel Hahn is a writer, editor and translator.



Gwendolyn Harper has translated work by Chilean writers Pedro Lemebel, Lina Meruane, and Nelly Richard, as well as the Spanish author Emilia Pardo Bazán. Her translations and essays have appeared in D21 Editions, JoLT, and The Caravan. She will be starting an MFA in fiction at Brown University this fall



Photo by Víctor Rodríguez Núñez

Katherine M. Hedeen is the National Endowment for the Humanities Distinguished Teaching Associate Professor of Spanish at Kenyon College. She specializes in Latin American poetry and has researched and translated numerous contemporary authors from the region. Her translations appear extensively in prestigious American and British literary journals. Her published book-length translations include collections by Juan Bañuelos, Juan Calzadilla, Marco Antonio Campos, Luis García Montero, Juan Gelman, Fayad Jamís, José Emilio Pacheco, Víctor Rodríguez Núñez, and Ida Vitale. She is an associate editor of Earthwork’s Latin American Poetry in Translation Series for Salt Publishing.



Katherine M. Hedeen is a translator, literary critic, and essayist. A specialist in Latin American poetry, she has translated some of the most respected voices from the region. Her publications include book-length collections by Jorgenrique Adoum, Juan Bañuelos, Juan Calzadilla, Juan Gelman, Fayad Jamís, Hugo Mujica, José Emilio Pacheco, Víctor Rodríguez Núñez, and Ida Vitale, among many others. She is a recipient of two NEA Translation grants in the US and a PEN Translates award in the UK. She is the Associate Editor for Action Books and the Poetry in Translation Editor at the Kenyon Review. She resides in Ohio, where she is Professor of Spanish at Kenyon College. More information at: www.katherinemhedeen.com



Katherine M. Hedeen is a translator, literary critic, and essayist. A specialist in Latin American poetry, she has translated some of the most respected voices from the region. Her publications include book-length collections by Jorgenrique Adoum, Juan Bañuelos, Juan Calzadilla, Juan Gelman, Fayad Jamís, Hugo Mujica, José Emilio Pacheco, Víctor Rodríguez Núñez, and Ida Vitale, among many others. She is a recipient of two NEA Translation grants in the US and a PEN Translates award in the UK. She is the Associate Editor for Action Books and the Poetry in Translation Editor at the Kenyon Review. She resides in Ohio, where she is Professor of Spanish at Kenyon College. More information at: www.katherinemhedeen.com



Janet Hendrickson translates from Spanish and Portuguese. Her experimental translation of Sebastián de Covarrubias’s Treasure of the Castilian or Spanish Language (New Directions, 2019), which turns the original Golden Age dictionary into a series of prose poems, was longlisted for the 2020 PEN Award for Poetry in Translation. She is also the translator of The Future Is Not Ours (ed. Diego Trelles Paz, Open Letter, 2012), an anthology of contemporary Latin American fiction. She holds a PhD in Romance Studies from Cornell and an MFA in Nonfiction Writing from the University of Iowa.



George Henson is the translator of many of Latin America’s most important writers, including Cervantes laureates Sergio Pitol (The Art of Flight, The Journey, The Magician of Vienna, and Mephisto’s Waltz: Selected Short Stories) and Elena Poniatowska (The Heart of the Artichoke). His translations have appeared in World Literature Today, the Paris Review, Granta, and Two Lines. In addition to serving as an editor-at-large for Latin American Literature Today, he is an assistant professor of Spanish Translation at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies in Monterey.



Rowena Hill lives in Mérida, Venezuela. She has taught English Literature at the Universidad de los Andes in Mérida, and she has published several verse collections in Spanish, as well as poems, essays, and translations in Venezuelan, Colombian, Indian, and US publications. She has translated some of the best known Venezuelan poets into English.



Edward Waters Hood has translated several Central American novels, including works by Rosario Aguilar, Manlio Argueta, Mario Roberto Morales, Linda Berrón, and Roberto Castillo. He has taught Latin American literature at Northern Arizona University since 1991.



Photo: Alex Zucker

Sophie Hughes is a literary translator from Spanish, known for her translations of writers such as Alia Trabucco Zerán, Rodrigo Hasbún, Enrique Vila-Matas and José Revueltas. In 2020 she was shortlisted for the International Booker Prize for her translation of Fernanda MelchorHurricane Season.


Sydney Hutchinson is an ethnomusicologist, folklorist, and pianist by training. She has published several books and numerous articles in both Spanish and English on Latin American and Caribbean music and dance. Currently living in Berlin, she spends her spare time yodeling and playing protest music on accordion.



Lorena Iglesias Meléndez (Valledupar, 1984) is an editor and translator. She formerly taught classes on literature, Spanish, and academic writing in large and small institutions in Bogotá and the United States, where she moved in 2013 in order to complete a doctorate. She is currently dedicated to reading about feminism, anarchy, the abolition of the family, and criticism of work. She lives in Bogotá. She writes for the blog bilinguadas.


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