Translators

Browse through all of the translators in LALT.

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Letícia Goellner is a researcher and professor at the Faculty of Letters of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Postdoc in Translation Studies (Literary translation) from the Universidade de Brasília, Brazil. PhD in Translation Studies from the Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Brazil. She has been working, since 2012, on the academic journal Cadernos de Tradução (SciELO collection) as assistant editor. Her areas of specialty and research interest are: Translation theory, Translation Studies, Translation of Latin American Literature, and Literary translation. 


Carlos F. Grigsby (1988) is a poet and translator. He has published the verse collection Una oscuridad brillando en la claridad que la claridad no logra comprender [A darkness shining in the brightness that the brightness cannot understand] (Visor, 2008). He is completing a doctorate in literary translation and Spanish American literature at the University of Oxford.



Photo: Carlos Ancheta

Arturo Gutiérrez Plaza is a poet, essayist, and university professor. He serves as the Associate Editor and Book Reviews Editor of Latin American Literature Today

He has published the following verse collections: Al margen de las hojas (Caracas: Monte Ávila, 1991), De espaldas al río (Caracas: El pez soluble, 1999), Principios de Contabilidad (Mexico: Conaculta, 2000), Pasado en Limpio (Caracas: Equinoccio, bid&co, 2006), and Cuidados intensivos (Caracas: Lugar Común, 2014). His books of essays, literary research, and anthologies include: Lecturas desplazadas: Encuentros hispanoamericanos con Cervantes y Góngora(Caracas: Equinoccio, 2009), Itinerarios de la ciudad en la poesía venezolana: una metáfora del cambio (Caracas: Fundación para la Cultura Urbana, 2010), Las palabras necesarias. Muestra antológica de poesía venezolana del siglo XX(Santiago de Chile: LOM, 2010), and Formas en fuga. Antología poética de Juan Calzadilla(Caracas: Biblioteca Ayacucho, 2011).

Among other prizes, he has won: the Mariano Picón Salas prize for poetry (Venezuela) in 1995, the Premio Hispanoamericano de Poesía Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (Mexico), in 1999, and the Premio Transgenérico de la Fundación para la Cultura Urbana (Venezuela) in 2009. He is a retired senior professor at the Universidad Simón Bolívar (Venezuela), and he currently works as a Distinguished Visiting Professor at the University of Oklahoma.



Daniel Hahn is a writer, editor and translator.



Gwendolyn Harper has translated work by Chilean writers Pedro Lemebel, Lina Meruane, and Nelly Richard, as well as the Spanish author Emilia Pardo Bazán. Her translations and essays have appeared in D21 Editions, JoLT, and The Caravan. She will be starting an MFA in fiction at Brown University this fall



Katherine M. Hedeen is a translator, literary critic, and essayist. A specialist in Latin American poetry, she has translated some of the most respected voices from the region. Her publications include book-length collections by Jorgenrique Adoum, Juan Bañuelos, Juan Calzadilla, Juan Gelman, Fayad Jamís, Hugo Mujica, José Emilio Pacheco, Víctor Rodríguez Núñez, and Ida Vitale, among many others. She is a recipient of two NEA Translation grants in the US and a PEN Translates award in the UK. She is the Associate Editor for Action Books and the Poetry in Translation Editor at the Kenyon Review. She resides in Ohio, where she is Professor of Spanish at Kenyon College. More information at: www.katherinemhedeen.com



Photo by Víctor Rodríguez Núñez

Katherine M. Hedeen is the National Endowment for the Humanities Distinguished Teaching Associate Professor of Spanish at Kenyon College. She specializes in Latin American poetry and has researched and translated numerous contemporary authors from the region. Her translations appear extensively in prestigious American and British literary journals. Her published book-length translations include collections by Juan Bañuelos, Juan Calzadilla, Marco Antonio Campos, Luis García Montero, Juan Gelman, Fayad Jamís, José Emilio Pacheco, Víctor Rodríguez Núñez, and Ida Vitale. She is an associate editor of Earthwork’s Latin American Poetry in Translation Series for Salt Publishing.



Janet Hendrickson translates from Spanish and Portuguese. Her experimental translation of Sebastián de Covarrubias’s Treasure of the Castilian or Spanish Language (New Directions, 2019), which turns the original Golden Age dictionary into a series of prose poems, was longlisted for the 2020 PEN Award for Poetry in Translation. She is also the translator of The Future Is Not Ours (ed. Diego Trelles Paz, Open Letter, 2012), an anthology of contemporary Latin American fiction. She holds a PhD in Romance Studies from Cornell and an MFA in Nonfiction Writing from the University of Iowa.



George Henson is the translator of many of Latin America’s most important writers, including Cervantes laureates Sergio Pitol (The Art of Flight, The Journey, The Magician of Vienna, and Mephisto’s Waltz: Selected Short Stories) and Elena Poniatowska (The Heart of the Artichoke). His translations have appeared in World Literature Today, the Paris Review, Granta, and Two Lines. In addition to serving as an editor-at-large for Latin American Literature Today, he is an assistant professor of Spanish Translation at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies in Monterey.



Rowena Hill lives in Mérida, Venezuela. She has taught English Literature at the Universidad de los Andes in Mérida, and she has published several verse collections in Spanish, as well as poems, essays, and translations in Venezuelan, Colombian, Indian, and US publications. She has translated some of the best known Venezuelan poets into English.



Edward Waters Hood has translated several Central American novels, including works by Rosario Aguilar, Manlio Argueta, Mario Roberto Morales, Linda Berrón, and Roberto Castillo. He has taught Latin American literature at Northern Arizona University since 1991.



Photo: Alex Zucker

Sophie Hughes is a literary translator from Spanish, known for her translations of writers such as Alia Trabucco Zerán, Rodrigo Hasbún, Enrique Vila-Matas and José Revueltas. In 2020 she was shortlisted for the International Booker Prize for her translation of Fernanda MelchorHurricane Season.


Sydney Hutchinson is an ethnomusicologist, folklorist, and pianist by training. She has published several books and numerous articles in both Spanish and English on Latin American and Caribbean music and dance. Currently living in Berlin, she spends her spare time yodeling and playing protest music on accordion.



Lorrie Jayne is a poet, translator, writer, and educator from the desert border region of the United States. She teaches Spanish and Portuguese in the Department of Languages and Literatures at the University of North Carolina in Asheville, NC. Lorrie’s interests include poetry, plants and healing, memoir, Amazonian literature, and intercultural communication. She lives with her husband and daughters in the Blue Ridge mountains of North Carolina. 



Rhi Johnson is a PhD candidate at UNC Chapel Hill, working on transatlantic Hispanic nineteenth-century literature. Her research centers images of water in literary representations of femininity, seeking the universals that lurk below the century’s surface, using narrative verse and poetic prose to access social imaginaries of medicine, morbidity, sexuality, and gender. This study of the delicacies of literature informs her endeavors in poetry, translation, and playwriting. She has published translations from Galician, Galego-Português, and Spanish. 



Ellen Jones has a PhD from Queen Mary University of London and translates from Spanish into English. She was the recipient of a 2017 Writers Centre Norwich Emerging Translator Mentorship and a 2017 ALTA Travel Fellowship, and has been Criticism Editor at Asymptote since 2014. Her translation of Rodrigo Fuentes’s Trout, Belly Up, is forthcoming from Charco Press in 2019, and her translations of several more stories from Brother Deer remain unpublished. She tweets as @ellen_c_jones.



Peter Kahn is a professional translator living in Vermont (USA). He has translated works of fiction and nonfiction by numerous Latin American and Spanish writers, including Tununa Mercado, Elvira Orphée, Esther Cross, Javier Moreno, Hugo Clemente, and Gwendolyn Diaz. His fiction and poetry translations have appeared in various publications, including Grand Street, Gastronomia, Santa Barbara Review, Modern Poetry in Translation, The Massachusetts Review, and several anthologies. In 2015, he was awarded the Massachusetts Annual Chametzky Prize for his translation of Márgara Russotto´s poem “Of Useless Knowledge.”



Aviva Kana is a PhD candidate in Hispanic Literature at the University of California, Santa Barbara with a doctoral emphasis in Translation Studies. Her translations of Cristina Rivera Garza have appeared in Review: Literature and Arts of the Americas and PEN America. She is currently in the process of translating Rivera Garza’s novella The Taiga Syndrome


Nurit Kasztelan has published the collections Movimientos Incorpóreos (Bs. As., 2007), Teoremas (Montevideo, 2010), Lógica de los accidentes (Bs. As. 2013, Cáceres, 2014, 2015), O amor era um jogo instável (Sao Pablo, 2018), and Después (Bs. As. 2018, Cáceres, 2019). She coordinated the reading series La manzana en el gusano and co-edited the magazine No-retornable. She is co-editor of the publishing house Excursiones and runs an atypical bookshop in her house: MiCasa.


Nurit Kasztelan has published the collections Movimientos Incorpóreos (Bs. As., 2007), Teoremas (Montevideo, 2010), Lógica de los accidentes (Bs. As. 2013, Cáceres, 2014, 2015), O amor era um jogo instável (Sao Pablo, 2018), and Después (Bs. As. 2018, Cáceres, 2019). She coordinated the reading series La manzana en el gusano and co-edited the magazine No-retornable. She is co-editor of the publishing house Excursiones and runs an atypical bookshop in her house: MiCasa.



Montague Kobbé was born in Caracas, Venezuela, and has lived in the UK, Germany, and Spain. His work has been published in the New York Times and El Nacional (Venezuela) among many other media outlets. He is the author of The Night of the Rambler (a finalist for the Premio Literario Casa de las Américas) and Tales of Bed Sheets and Departure Lounges, and his latest novel is entitled On the Way Back. He currently lives in London.


John Z. Komurki’s recent projects include Mexican Poets Go Home (Bongo Books), a bilingual anthology, as co-editor and translator, and Risomania (Niggli), as author. He is working on a study of printing in Mexico.



Denise Kripper is an Assistant Professor of Spanish at Lake Forest College, where she teaches courses on Latin American literature and Translation Studies. She holds a PhD in Literature and Cultural Studies from Georgetown University and a BA in literary translation from her native Argentina. She lives in Chicago, where she’s a member of the Third Coast Translators Collective.



Rosa María Lazo is a full-time associate professor and Vice Dean at the Faculty of Literature and Linguistics of the Pontificia Universidad Católica of Chile. She is also a professional English-French-Spanish translator.



Mark Leech lives in Oxford. His most recent chapbook, Borderlands, a follow-up to his Chang’an Poems, is published by Original Plus. He has published chapbooks of Spanish and Old English translations, and London Water, a sequence of long poems about London’s hidden rivers. He blogs at openfieldblog.wordpress.com. He won the Stephen Spender Prize in 2004 for his translation of the Old English poem The Dream of the Rood.



Mark Leech lives in Oxford. His most recent chapbook, Borderlands, a follow-up to his Chang’an Poems, is published by Original Plus. He has published chapbooks of Spanish and Old English translations, and London Water, a sequence of long poems about London’s hidden rivers. He blogs at openfieldblog.wordpress.com. He won the Stephen Spender Prize in 2004 for his translation of the Old English poem The Dream of the Rood.



Suzanne Jill Levine is General Editor of Penguin's paperback classics of Jorge Luis Borges' poetry and essays, and a noted translator of Latin American prose and poetry by distinguished writers such as Guillermo Cabrera Infante, Julio Cortázar, Carlos Fuentes, Jose Donoso, Manuel Puig, Severo Sarduy, and Adolfo Bioy Casares. Director of Translation Studies at UCSB, Levine is author of several books including The Subversive Scribe: Translating Latin American Fiction, and Manuel Puig and the Spiderwoman: His Life and Fictions. Her most recent published translation is Cristina Rivera Garza's The Taiga Syndrome (The Dorothy Project, 2018).



Suzanne Jill Levine is General Editor of Penguin's paperback classics of Jorge Luis Borges' poetry and essays, and a noted translator of Latin American prose and poetry by distinguished writers such as Guillermo Cabrera Infante, Julio Cortázar, Carlos Fuentes, Jose Donoso, Manuel Puig, Severo Sarduy, and Adolfo Bioy Casares. Director of Translation Studies at UCSB, Levine is author of several books including The Subversive Scribe: Translating Latin American Fiction, and Manuel Puig and the Spiderwoman: His Life and Fictions. Her most recent published translation is Cristina Rivera Garza's The Taiga Syndrome (The Dorothy Project, 2018).



Alexis Levitin has published forty-five books in translation, mostly poetry from Portugal, Brazil, and Ecuador.  In addition to three books by Salgado Maranhão, his work includes Clarice Lispector’s Soulstorm and Eugénio de Andrade’s Forbidden Words, both from New Directions. He has served as a Fulbright Lecturer at the Universities of Oporto and Coimbra, Portugal, The Catholic University in Guayaquil, Ecuador, and the Federal University of Santa Catarina, in Brazil and has held translation residencies at Banff, Canada, Straelen, Germany (twice), and the Rockefeller Foundation Study Center in Bellagio, Italy.



Brook Danielle Lillehaugen is a linguist specializing in indigenous languages of Mexico. Currently an assistant professor at Haverford College, she received her PhD in 2006 from UCLA. She has been working with speakers of Zapotec languages since 1999. Her first literary translation of Zapotec poetry was published in 2017 in Latin American Literary Review. For more information: http://brooklillehaugen.weebly.com/


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