Translators

Browse through all of the translators in LALT.

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Heather Cleary’s translations include Roque Larraquy’s Comemadre, which was longlisted for the National Book Award for Translated Literature, César Rendueles’s Sociophobia, Sergio Chejfec’s The Planets and The Dark, and a selection of Oliverio Girondo’s poetry for New Directions.


Heather Cleary is a translator, writer, and one of the founding editors of the digital, bilingual Buenos Aires Review. Her translations and literary criticism have appeared in Two LinesA Public Space, and Words Without Borders, among other publications.

Her book-length translations include Sergio Chejfec’s The Planets (finalist, Best Translated Book Award 2013) and The Dark (nominee, ALTA’s National Translation Award 2014) and Poems to Read on a Streetcar, a selection of Girondo’s poetry published by New Directions (recipient, PEN and Programa SUR translation grants). She holds an MA in Comparative Literature from NYU and a PhD in Latin American and Iberian Cultures from Columbia University, and currently teaches at Sarah Lawrence College.

She has served on the jury of the Best Translated Book Award (2016) and the PEN Translation Award (2015), helped organize the annual conference of the Barnard Center for Translation Studies (2015), and is known to jump at the chance to talk about contemporary Latin American literature and various translation-related topics.



Charlotte Coombe is a British translator working from French and Spanish into English. Her translation of Abnousse Shalmani’s Khomeini, Sade and Me (World Editions, 2016) won a PEN Translates award in 2015. She has translated The President's Room by Ricardo Romero (2017) and Fish Soup by Margarita García Robayo (2018), both for Charco Press, and Eduardo Berti's novel The Imagined Land (2018) for Deep Vellum Publishing. She has also translated poetry and short stories by Rosa María Roffiel, Edgardo Nuñez Caballero and Santiago Roncagliolo, for Palabras Errantes. She was awarded a second PEN Translates award in 2019 for her forthcoming translation of the novel Holiday Heart by Margarita García Robayo (Charco Press, 2020) and was also shortlisted for the Premio Valle Inclán 2019 for her translation of Fish Soup by the same author.



Charlotte Coombe is a British translator working from French and Spanish into English. Her translation of Abnousse Shalmani’s Khomeini, Sade and Me (World Editions, 2016) won a PEN Translates award in 2015. She has translated The President's Room by Ricardo Romero (2017) and Fish Soup by Margarita García Robayo (2018), both for Charco Press, and Eduardo Berti's novel The Imagined Land (2018) for Deep Vellum Publishing. She has also translated poetry and short stories by Rosa María Roffiel, Edgardo Nuñez Caballero and Santiago Roncagliolo, for Palabras Errantes. She was awarded a second PEN Translates award in 2019 for her forthcoming translation of the novel Holiday Heart by Margarita García Robayo (Charco Press, 2020) and was also shortlisted for the Premio Valle Inclán 2019 for her translation of Fish Soup by the same author.



Patricia Coral was born in Puerto Rico, where she developed her passion for words and earned a master's in Spanish Literature and Linguistics. In 2014, she moved to Houston, where she set off on the adventure of writing in a borrowed language. She writes nonfiction and poetry, but her words often find their home somewhere between the two genres. In 2017, she co-founded Fuente Collective (fuenteco.com), an organization dedicated to experimentation, collaboration, and hybridism in creative writing and other arts. Her work in English has been published in Yellow Chair Review and Crab Fat Magazine.



Isabella Corletto was born in Guatemala City, Guatemala. She graduated from Wesleyan University in 2018 with degrees in English and Italian Studies and currently works at Indent Literary Agency. She speaks Spanish, English, Italian, and Portuguese. Her translation of Amalia Andrade’s Things You Think About When You Bite Your Nails is forthcoming from Penguin Books in the fall of 2020. 


Robert Croll is a writer, translator, musician, and artist originally from Asheville, North Carolina. He first came to translation during his undergraduate studies at Amherst College, where he focused particularly on the short fiction of Julio Cortázar.



Jonathan Cukla is an undergraduate student at the University of Minnesota, where he studies journalism and Spanish and Portuguese Studies. In addition to his studies and working as the Peer Advisor for the Dept. of Spanish and Portuguese Studies, Jonathan is conducting a research project on the relationship between sexual identities in Brazil and the fictitious concept of racial democracy. His interests strongly revolve around languages and communication, human rights and world music.



Vanessa Curless is a freelance translator. She holds an MA in Spanish translation from the Middlebury Institute of International Studies in Monterey. He translation, “Violeta Parra: Ahead of Her Time,” appeared in the November 2018 issue of Latin American Literature Today.



Rosario Drucker Davis was born in Mexico to an American father and Mexican mother. At the age of eleven, she moved with her family to Lexington, Kentucky where her father took a position as professor of anthropology at the University of Kentucky.  Rosario earned a B.A. in linguistics at the University of Kentucky, an M.A. in English as a Second Language at the University of Arizona, and an M.A. in French literature at the University of Cincinnati.  During the 2007-08 academic year, she was a visiting teaching assistant at the English Department at the University of Angers, France. She currently teaches Spanish at the University of Cincinnati Clermont College.  



Rosario Drucker Davis was born in Mexico to an American father and Mexican mother. At the age of eleven, she moved with her family to Lexington, Kentucky where her father took a position as professor of anthropology at the University of Kentucky.  Rosario earned a B.A. in linguistics at the University of Kentucky, an M.A. in English as a Second Language at the University of Arizona, and an M.A. in French literature at the University of Cincinnati.  During the 2007-08 academic year, she was a visiting teaching assistant at the English Department at the University of Angers, France. She currently teaches Spanish at the University of Cincinnati Clermont College.  



Adrian Demopulos was born in Dallas, Texas. She graduated from the University of Oklahoma with BAs in Spanish and communication. In the fall, she will be pursuing an MFA in Literary Translation at the University of Iowa. Her translations have appeared in Latin American Literature Today and in the anthology A Larger Reality: Speculative Fiction from the Bicultural Margins by The Mexicanx Initiative.



Whitney DeVos is a writer, translator, and scholar. As a PhD candidate at UC Santa Cruz, she is currently completing a doctoral dissertation on documentary poetics in the Americas after 1945. Individual translations have appeared or are forthcoming in Chicago Review, Copper Nickel, and The Acentos Review, and a translation of prose by Sergio Chejfec will appear this year with Ugly Duckling Presse. She is also the author of a chapbook, On Being Blonde, and an assistant poetry editor at Asymptote.



Lisa Dillman translates from the Spanish and Catalan and teaches in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at Emory University. She has translated more than twenty novels, including those of Sabina Berman, Andrés Barba and Yuri Herrera. Her translation of Herrera’s Signs Preceding the End of the World won the 2016 Best Translated Book Award. 



Photo by Sydne Gray

Arthur Dixon works as a translator and as Managing Editor of Latin American Literature Today. His translation of Andrés Felipe Solano’s “The Nameless Saints” (WLT, Sept. 2014) was nominated for a 2014 Pushcart Prize, and his most recent project is a book-length translation of Arturo Gutiérrez Plaza’s Cuidados intensivos (see WLT, Sept. 2016).



Kevin Gerry Dunn is a Spanish–English translator specializing in literature, art, gender, and immigration. He is a 2020 PEN/Heim Translation Grant recipient, and his recent translations include Countersexual Manifesto by Paul B. Preciado (Columbia University Press, 2018) and Revealing Selves: Transgender Portraits from Argentina by Kike Arnal and Josefina Fernández (The New Press, 2018). He also heads the FTrMP Project, an effort to make Spanish translations of vital migration paperwork available for free online. His website is www.kgdtranslation.com.
 



Rachel Echeto is an MA student in Spanish translation at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies in Monterey. She was co-translator of Alberto Chimal’s City X: a Novel in 101 Tweets, which appeared in the November 2018 issue of Latin American Literature Today.



Laura Cesarco Eglin is the translator of Of Death. Minimal Odes by Hilda Hilst, (co•im•press), which won the 2019 Best Translated Book Award in Poetry. Her translations from Spanish, Portuguese, Portuñol, and Galician have appeared in a variety of journals, including Timber, Exchanges, Modern Poetry in Translation, Eleven Eleven, The Massachusetts Review, Cordella Magazine, Gulf Coast: A Journal of Literature and Fine Arts, and The Puritan. Cesarco Eglin is the author of five poetry collections, including Calling Water by Its Name (trans. Scott Spanbauer; Mouthfeel Press), Occasions to Call Miracles Appropriate (The Lune), and Reborn in Ink (trans. Catherine Jagoe and Jesse Lee Kercheval; The Word Works). She is the co-founding editor and publisher of Veliz Books.



Gillian Esquivia-Cohen, a dual citizen of the United States and Colombia, is a writer and translator. She is currently an MFA candidate at the Institute of American Indian Arts, where she is working on a novel. 



Photo: Blanca Irene Arbelaez

Miguel Falquez-Certain is the author of six volumes of poetry, six plays, a novella, and a book of short fiction, Triacas, for which he has received several awards. He has a B.A. in Spanish and French (Hunter College, 1980), did his Ph.D. course work in Comparative Literature at New York University (1981-85), and studied the art and theory of translation with Richard Howard and André Lefebvre at NYU. ATA-certified, and a PEN Club and Proz.com member, he has lived in NYC since the seventies working as a translator in five languages.



Slava Faybysh is a freelance translator based in Chicago. His translations can be viewed on Asymptote, Lunch Ticket, and Palabras Errantes.



Ana María Ferreira is an assistant professor at the University of Indianapolis, where she teaches and researches on Latin American Literature and Culture.  Ferreira graduated from Georgetown University, and she is interested in colonial and postcolonial indigenous writers.  For many years, Ferreira has collaborated with Estercilia Simanca, and she dedicated two chapters of her PhD dissertation to her work.  To Professor Ferreira, indigenous literature has been, from the 15th century to this day, not just a form of preserving traditional indigenous stories and cultures, but also a form of resistance to colonization.  She is also a regular contributor to the Colombian magazine Razón Pública.



Paul Filev translates from Macedonian and Spanish. He was awarded a Literary Translation Fellowship by Dalkey Archive Press in 2015. His translations include Sasho Dimoski’s Alma Mahler (Dalkey Archive Press, 2018) and Eduardo Sánchez Rugeles’s Blue Label (Turtle Point Press, 2018). He lives in Melbourne. www.paulfilev.com



Ezra E. Fitz began his literary life at Princeton University, studying under the tutelage of James Irby, C.K. Williams, David Bellos, and Jonathan Galassi. His senior thesis was described by the late Robert Fagles as "a heartening manifesto" on the art of translation. Since then, he has worked with Grammy winning musician Juanes, Emmy winning journalist Jorge Ramos, and the king of soccer himself, Pelé. His translations of contemporary Latin American literature by Alberto Fuguet and Eloy Urroz have been praised by The New York Times, The Washington Post, The New Yorker, and The Believer, among other publications. His work has appeared in The Boston Review, Harper's Magazine, and Words Without Borders, he has been awarded grants from the Mexican National Fund for Culture and Arts (FONCA), and he was a 2010 Resident at the Banff International Literary Translation Centre in Alberta, Canada.



Caro Friszman has a translation degree from the Instituto en Lenguas Vivas Juan Ramón Fernández in Buenos Aires, Argentina. She has worked as a freelance translator in a variety of fields, particularly in social science and audiovisual translation. She taught social science translation at the Belgrano University in Buenos Aires. She has collaborated both as a translator and an editor in several published translations; most recently among them are Licensed Larseny, by Nicholas Hildyard, and Exciting the Industry of Mankind, by George Caffentzis. She is part of the translators’ roster at the UN.



Caro Friszman has a translation degree from the Instituto en Lenguas Vivas Juan Ramón Fernández in Buenos Aires, Argentina. She has worked as a freelance translator in a variety of fields, particularly in social science and audiovisual translation. She taught social science translation at the Belgrano University in Buenos Aires. She has collaborated both as a translator and an editor in several published translations; most recently among them are Licensed Larseny, by Nicholas Hildyard, and Exciting the Industry of Mankind, by George Caffentzis. She is part of the translators’ roster at the UN.



Anthony L. Geist is Professor of Spanish and Comparative Literature at the University of Washington (Seattle). Geist has taught previously at Princeton, the University of Texas (San Antonio), and Dartmouth. He has published widely on twentieth-century Spanish and Latin American poetry, and has translated the Spanish poets Jorge Guillén, Federico García Lorca, Álvaro Salvador, Luis García Montero and Luis Muñoz, as well as the Peruvian Edgar O’Hara. He is currently at work on an illustrated, trilingual edition of Rafael Alberti’s Roma, peligro para caminantes [Rome, danger for walkers]. More recently he has begun working in visual studies, including photoessays, art exhibits and documentary film. He considers himself fortunate that two of his great passions–poetry and the Spanish Civil War—are also his profession.



Dick Gerdes (dick.gerdes@gmail.com) is an award-winning translator who lives in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He has translated works from the Spanish by important novelists such as Alfredo Bryce Echenique, Ana María Shua, Diamela Eltit, and Gonzalo Celorio, among others.



Juliana Giusti Cavallin is an 11th-grade student at Norman High School. Studying in Venezuela, Spain, and at present, in the United States, she hopes to further her secondary education and continuing into a future undergraduate degree. She is currently one of the editors of The Trail, Norman High School's yearbook and has been published on Soupstone Norman High School's literary magazine.



Letícia Goellner is a researcher and professor at the Faculty of Letters of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Postdoc in Translation Studies (Literary translation) from the Universidade de Brasília, Brazil. PhD in Translation Studies from the Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Brazil. She has been working, since 2012, on the academic journal Cadernos de Tradução (SciELO collection) as assistant editor. Her areas of specialty and research interest are: Translation theory, Translation Studies, Translation of Latin American Literature, and Literary translation. 


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