Translators

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Rosa María Lazo is a full-time associate professor and Vice Dean at the Faculty of Literature and Linguistics of the Pontificia Universidad Católica of Chile. She is also a professional English-French-Spanish translator.



Mark Leech lives in Oxford. His most recent chapbook, Borderlands, a follow-up to his Chang’an Poems, is published by Original Plus. He has published chapbooks of Spanish and Old English translations, and London Water, a sequence of long poems about London’s hidden rivers. He blogs at openfieldblog.wordpress.com. He won the Stephen Spender Prize in 2004 for his translation of the Old English poem The Dream of the Rood.



Mark Leech lives in Oxford. His most recent chapbook, Borderlands, a follow-up to his Chang’an Poems, is published by Original Plus. He has published chapbooks of Spanish and Old English translations, and London Water, a sequence of long poems about London’s hidden rivers. He blogs at openfieldblog.wordpress.com. He won the Stephen Spender Prize in 2004 for his translation of the Old English poem The Dream of the Rood.



Suzanne Jill Levine is General Editor of Penguin's paperback classics of Jorge Luis Borges' poetry and essays, and a noted translator of Latin American prose and poetry by distinguished writers such as Guillermo Cabrera Infante, Julio Cortázar, Carlos Fuentes, Jose Donoso, Manuel Puig, Severo Sarduy, and Adolfo Bioy Casares. Director of Translation Studies at UCSB, Levine is author of several books including The Subversive Scribe: Translating Latin American Fiction, and Manuel Puig and the Spiderwoman: His Life and Fictions. Her most recent published translation is Cristina Rivera Garza's The Taiga Syndrome (The Dorothy Project, 2018).



Suzanne Jill Levine is General Editor of Penguin's paperback classics of Jorge Luis Borges' poetry and essays, and a noted translator of Latin American prose and poetry by distinguished writers such as Guillermo Cabrera Infante, Julio Cortázar, Carlos Fuentes, Jose Donoso, Manuel Puig, Severo Sarduy, and Adolfo Bioy Casares. Director of Translation Studies at UCSB, Levine is author of several books including The Subversive Scribe: Translating Latin American Fiction, and Manuel Puig and the Spiderwoman: His Life and Fictions. Her most recent published translation is Cristina Rivera Garza's The Taiga Syndrome (The Dorothy Project, 2018).



Alexis Levitin has published forty-five books in translation, mostly poetry from Portugal, Brazil, and Ecuador.  In addition to three books by Salgado Maranhão, his work includes Clarice Lispector’s Soulstorm and Eugénio de Andrade’s Forbidden Words, both from New Directions. He has served as a Fulbright Lecturer at the Universities of Oporto and Coimbra, Portugal, The Catholic University in Guayaquil, Ecuador, and the Federal University of Santa Catarina, in Brazil and has held translation residencies at Banff, Canada, Straelen, Germany (twice), and the Rockefeller Foundation Study Center in Bellagio, Italy.



Brook Danielle Lillehaugen is a linguist specializing in indigenous languages of Mexico. Currently an assistant professor at Haverford College, she received her PhD in 2006 from UCLA. She has been working with speakers of Zapotec languages since 1999. Her first literary translation of Zapotec poetry was published in 2017 in Latin American Literary Review. For more information: http://brooklillehaugen.weebly.com/



David Lisenby lives in Kansas City, Missouri, where he teaches Spanish at William Jewell College. He has translated work by Cuban writers Abilio Estévez, Anna Lidia Vega Serova, and Gerardo Fulleda León. His publications have appeared in Revista Canadiense de Estudios HispánicosAfro-Hispanic Review, Latin American Theatre Review, and Cuba Counterpoints.



Yazmine Livinalli is a translator from Caracas, Venezuela. She graduated with her degree in Translation and Interpreting in English, French, and Spanish from the Universidad Central de Venezuela. She is also a public interpreter and took specialized courses on legal translation at the Universidad Metropolitana. She has performed simultaneous and consecutive interpreting at various types of conferences, both in Venezuela and internationally. She has worked as an independent translator for over twenty years. Although the majority of her work is in scientific and technical fields, she works with several outlets and civil associations on matters of general social interest.


Olivia Lott is a doctoral student in Hispanic Language & Literature at Washington University in St. Louis (United States), specializing in contemporary Spanish American poetry and literary translation.  In 2015-2016, she received a Fulbright grant to translate contemporary poetry from Colombia.  These translations have been published in journals in and beyond the United States, including Mantis, Sakura Review, Círculo de Poesía, La Raíz Invertida and Otro Páramo.  



Olivia Lott’s translations of Spanish American poetry have most recently appeared in or are forthcoming from Brooklyn Rail in TranslationThe Kenyon Review, MAKE Magazine, Spoon River Poetry ReviewWaxwing, and World Literature Today. She is the co-translator (with Barbara Jamison) of Cuban poet Soleida Ríos’s The Dirty Text (Kenning Editions, 2018). Lott is a Ph.D. Student and Olin Fellow in Hispanic Studies at Washington University in St. Louis, where she is writing a dissertation on translation, revolution, and Latin American neo-avant-garde poetry.


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