Translators

Translators | c

Browse through all of the translators in LALT.

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | R | S | T | V | W | Y | Z

Nick Caistor has translated more than fifty books of fiction from Latin America and Spain including work by authors such as Andrés Neuman and Eduardo Mendoza. He is a three-times winner of the Valle-Inclán Prize for translation from Spanish.



Ashley B. Caja is a Washington, DC-based freelance translator who works from Spanish and Portuguese into English. She holds a PhD in Hispanic Literature and Cultural Studies from Georgetown University, where she specialized in contemporary Latin American literature.



Photo: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, May 2018

Roberto Cantú was born in Guadalajara, Mexico. He is Professor Emeritus of Chicana/o and Latina/o Studies, and Professor Emeritus of English at California State University, Los Angeles. He teaches courses on the European novel (Cervantes to Balzac), literary theory, and on Latin American, Mexican, and Chicana/o literature. He has numerous publications in his areas of interest, and is the editor of Border Folk Balladeers: Critical  Studies on Américo Paredes (2018);  The Forked Juniper: Critical Perspectives on Rudolfo Anaya (2016); Equestrian Rebels: Critical Perspectives on Mariano Azuela and the Novel of the Mexican Revolution (2016); The Reptant Eagle: Essays on Carlos Fuentes and the Art of the Novel (2015); The Willow and the Spiral: Essays on Octavio Paz and the Poetic Imagination (2014); An Insatiable Dialectic: Essays on Critique, Modernity, and Humanism (2013), and Tradition and Innovation in Mesoamerican Cultural History (2011). Cantú also edited the following:  Piel menos mía, by Octavio Armand, in a special issue of the literary journal Escolios: Revista de literatura, 1976); the bilingual edition (English/Spanish) of La raza cόsmica/The Cosmic Race, by José Vasconcelos (1979), and translated José Antonio Villarreal’s novel Pocho from English to Spanish (1994). In 1990 he received the Outstanding Professor Award at Cal State LA. In 2010 he was recognized at his campus with the President’s Distinguished Professor Award. He is currently editing a book on Mexican poet and essayist Alfonso Reyes, to be titled A Scholiast's Quill: New Critical Essays on Alfonso Reyes (forthcoming). 



Photo: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, May 2018

Roberto Cantú was born in Guadalajara, Mexico. He is Professor Emeritus of Chicana/o and Latina/o Studies, and Professor Emeritus of English at California State University, Los Angeles. He teaches courses on the European novel (Cervantes to Balzac), literary theory, and on Latin American, Mexican, and Chicana/o literature. He has numerous publications in his areas of interest, and is the editor of Border Folk Balladeers: Critical  Studies on Américo Paredes (2018);  The Forked Juniper: Critical Perspectives on Rudolfo Anaya (2016); Equestrian Rebels: Critical Perspectives on Mariano Azuela and the Novel of the Mexican Revolution (2016); The Reptant Eagle: Essays on Carlos Fuentes and the Art of the Novel (2015); The Willow and the Spiral: Essays on Octavio Paz and the Poetic Imagination (2014); An Insatiable Dialectic: Essays on Critique, Modernity, and Humanism (2013), and Tradition and Innovation in Mesoamerican Cultural History (2011). Cantú also edited the following:  Piel menos mía, by Octavio Armand, in a special issue of the literary journal Escolios: Revista de literatura, 1976); the bilingual edition (English/Spanish) of La raza cόsmica/The Cosmic Race, by José Vasconcelos (1979), and translated José Antonio Villarreal’s novel Pocho from English to Spanish (1994). In 1990 he received the Outstanding Professor Award at Cal State LA. In 2010 he was recognized at his campus with the President’s Distinguished Professor Award. He is currently editing a book on Mexican poet and essayist Alfonso Reyes, to be titled A Scholiast's Quill: New Critical Essays on Alfonso Reyes (forthcoming). 



Matthew Carman is a junior at the University of Oklahoma. He completed this translation as a part of a course dedicated to Spanish-to-English translation taught by Professor George Henson, Translation Editor of Latin American Literature Today.



Matthew Carman is a junior at the University of Oklahoma. He completed this translation as a part of a course dedicated to Spanish-to-English translation taught by Professor George Henson, Translation Editor of Latin American Literature Today.



Jorge Carrión (Tarragona, 1976) has lived in Mataró and Barcelona most of his life. He has a PhD in Humanities from the Pompeu Fabra University, Barcelona, and he manages the Master in Creative Writing at the same institution. He has lived in Buenos Aires, Rosario, and Chicago. He regularly publishes in several journals and magazines such as The New York Times en Español, El País, La Vanguardia, and Letras Libres. He is the author of a tetralogy of fiction (including Los muertos, Los huérfanos, Los turistas and Los difuntos) and is also the author of various non-fiction books, such as Australia: Un viaje, Teleshakespeare, Librerías and Barcelona: Libro de los pasajes. His work has been translated into Chinese, Portuguese, Italian, German, French, Polish, and English.



Claudia Cavallín is a writer and university professor. Author of the books Ciudades de película: Ficciones urbanas del cine, la literatura y la música (Editorial Académica Española, 2012) and Espectros de la palabra. La metáfora en Borges: los juegos del lenguaje que hacen posible la configuración de un universo de imágenes recursivas (Editorial Académica Española, 2012). Between 2012 and 2015, she was director of the academic journal Estudios. Revista de Investigaciones Literarias y Culturales. She has written essays on Jorge Luis Borges, José Revueltas, and Luisa Valenzuela, among other writers. She holds a degree in Social Communication with a focus on Humanistic Development (1996) and a Magister Scientiae in the area of Latin American and Caribbean Literature (2000). She is a professor in the Department of Languages and Literatures of the Universidad Simón Bolívar in Caracas, Venezuela. She is currently working toward her doctorate in the Department of Modern Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics of the University of Oklahoma.


Ardyn Clayton is currently pursuing an MA in English-Spanish Translation and Interpretation at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies in Monterey, California. She previously attended Lee University in Cleveland, Tennessee, where she obtained a BA in Spanish before deciding to pursue translation and interpretation at Middlebury.



Heather Cleary’s translations include Roque Larraquy’s Comemadre, which was longlisted for the National Book Award for Translated Literature, César Rendueles’s Sociophobia, Sergio Chejfec’s The Planets and The Dark, and a selection of Oliverio Girondo’s poetry for New Directions.


Heather Cleary is a translator, writer, and one of the founding editors of the digital, bilingual Buenos Aires Review. Her translations and literary criticism have appeared in Two LinesA Public Space, and Words Without Borders, among other publications.

Her book-length translations include Sergio Chejfec’s The Planets (finalist, Best Translated Book Award 2013) and The Dark (nominee, ALTA’s National Translation Award 2014) and Poems to Read on a Streetcar, a selection of Girondo’s poetry published by New Directions (recipient, PEN and Programa SUR translation grants). She holds an MA in Comparative Literature from NYU and a PhD in Latin American and Iberian Cultures from Columbia University, and currently teaches at Sarah Lawrence College.

She has served on the jury of the Best Translated Book Award (2016) and the PEN Translation Award (2015), helped organize the annual conference of the Barnard Center for Translation Studies (2015), and is known to jump at the chance to talk about contemporary Latin American literature and various translation-related topics.



Charlotte Coombe is a British translator working from French and Spanish into English. Her translation of Abnousse Shalmani’s Khomeini, Sade and Me (World Editions, 2016) won a PEN Translates award in 2015. She has translated The President's Room by Ricardo Romero (2017) and Fish Soup by Margarita García Robayo (2018), both for Charco Press, and Eduardo Berti's novel The Imagined Land (2018) for Deep Vellum Publishing. She has also translated poetry and short stories by Rosa María Roffiel, Edgardo Nuñez Caballero and Santiago Roncagliolo, for Palabras Errantes. She was awarded a second PEN Translates award in 2019 for her forthcoming translation of the novel Holiday Heart by Margarita García Robayo (Charco Press, 2020) and was also shortlisted for the Premio Valle Inclán 2019 for her translation of Fish Soup by the same author.



Charlotte Coombe is a British translator working from French and Spanish into English. Her translation of Abnousse Shalmani’s Khomeini, Sade and Me (World Editions, 2016) won a PEN Translates award in 2015. She has translated The President's Room by Ricardo Romero (2017) and Fish Soup by Margarita García Robayo (2018), both for Charco Press, and Eduardo Berti's novel The Imagined Land (2018) for Deep Vellum Publishing. She has also translated poetry and short stories by Rosa María Roffiel, Edgardo Nuñez Caballero and Santiago Roncagliolo, for Palabras Errantes. She was awarded a second PEN Translates award in 2019 for her forthcoming translation of the novel Holiday Heart by Margarita García Robayo (Charco Press, 2020) and was also shortlisted for the Premio Valle Inclán 2019 for her translation of Fish Soup by the same author.



Patricia Coral was born in Puerto Rico, where she developed her passion for words and earned a master's in Spanish Literature and Linguistics. In 2014, she moved to Houston, where she set off on the adventure of writing in a borrowed language. She writes nonfiction and poetry, but her words often find their home somewhere between the two genres. In 2017, she co-founded Fuente Collective (fuenteco.com), an organization dedicated to experimentation, collaboration, and hybridism in creative writing and other arts. Her work in English has been published in Yellow Chair Review and Crab Fat Magazine.



Isabella Corletto was born in Guatemala City, Guatemala. She graduated from Wesleyan University in 2018 with degrees in English and Italian Studies and currently works at Indent Literary Agency. She speaks Spanish, English, Italian, and Portuguese. Her translation of Amalia Andrade’s Things You Think About When You Bite Your Nails is forthcoming from Penguin Books in the fall of 2020. 


Robert Croll is a writer, translator, musician, and artist originally from Asheville, North Carolina. He first came to translation during his undergraduate studies at Amherst College, where he focused particularly on the short fiction of Julio Cortázar.



Jonathan Cukla is an undergraduate student at the University of Minnesota, where he studies journalism and Spanish and Portuguese Studies. In addition to his studies and working as the Peer Advisor for the Dept. of Spanish and Portuguese Studies, Jonathan is conducting a research project on the relationship between sexual identities in Brazil and the fictitious concept of racial democracy. His interests strongly revolve around languages and communication, human rights and world music.



Vanessa Curless is a freelance translator. She holds an MA in Spanish translation from the Middlebury Institute of International Studies in Monterey. He translation, “Violeta Parra: Ahead of Her Time,” appeared in the November 2018 issue of Latin American Literature Today.


Languages

Follow Us

 
 

Visit WLT