Author Index

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  • Naida Saavedra is a writer of fiction, literary critic, and professor. She is the author of Vos no viste que no lloré por vos (2009), Hábitat (2013), Última inocencia (2013), En esta tierra maldita (2013), and Vestier y otras miserias (2015). Her short stories have been published in different anthologies and magazines such as El BeiSMan, ViceVersa, and Digo.Palabra.TxT. Saavedra holds a PhD in Latin American Literature from Florida State University and does research on Latina/o Literature. Currently, she is documenting the New Latino Boom, the 21st century literary movement in Spanish from the United States. She is presently writing an essay book about this movement, which will be published in 2019. Saavedra lives in Massachusetts, and is a professor at Worcester State University.


  • Karina Sainz Borgo was born and raised in Caracas. She began her career in Venezuela as a journalist for El Nacional. Since immigrating to Spain, she has written for Vozpópuli and collaborates with the literary magazine Zenda. She is the author of two nonfiction books, Tráfico y Guaire (2008) and Caracas Hip-Hop (2008).  La hija de la Española [It Would Be Night in Caracas] is her first work of fiction. The book has become unprecedented publishing phenomenon for a piece of Spanish literature: its rights were sold in eighteen countries before its publication.


  • Adalber Salas Hernández (Caracas, 1987). Poeta, ensayista y traductor. Su libro Salvoconducto fue merecedor del XXXVI Premio de Poesía Arcipreste de Hita, el cual fue publicado por la editorial española Pre-Textos en 2015. Ha traducido a Marguerite Duras, Antonin Artaud, Rimbaud, Charles Wright y Mário De Andrade. Forma parte del comité editorial de las revistas Poesía y Buenos Aires Poetry. Cursa estudios doctorales en la New York University.



  • Claudia Salazar Jiménez is a Peruvian writer and academic. She studied literature at the National University of San Marcos and has a Ph.D. in Latin American Literature from the University of New York (NYU). Her first novel La sangre de la aurora, written from a female perspective on the internal armed conflict in Peru, won the Las Americas Narrative Award in 2014. Her research and publication projects link writings of the self with the politics of memory. She has edited the anthologies Voces para Lilith: Literatura contemporánea de temática lésbica en Latinoamérica, Escribir en Nueva York: Antología de narradores hispanoamericanos, and Pachacuti feminista, which will be published this year.



  • Colombian writer Alberto Salcedo Ramos (Barranquilla, 1963) has worked as a narrative journalist for many years and is recognized as one of the principal authors of the contemporary Latin American chronicle. He has written chronicles for the magazines SoHo and Gatopardo, and he has worked as a correspondent for the German magazine Ecos in Colombia. He has published the books Los golpes de la esperanza [The blows of hope] (1993), De un hombre obligado a levantarse con el pie derecho y otras crónicas [Of a man obligated to get up on the right side of the bed and other chronicles] (1999), El Oro y la Oscuridad: La vida gloriosa y trágica de Kid Pambelé [Gold and darkness: the glorious and tragic life of Kid Pambelé] (2005), La eterna parranda (Crónicas 1997-2011) [The eternal binge (chronicles 1997-2011)], and Diez juglares en su patio [Ten minstrels on his patio] (1994), the latter with Jorge García Usta. A remarkable chronicler, he has been included in many anthologies dedicated to this genre. He has also been awarded, among other distinctions, with the Premio Internacional de Periodismo Rey de España, the Premio Nacional de Periodismo Simón Bolívar (five times), the Premio al Mejor Libro de Periodismo del Año (awarded by the Cámara Colombiana del Libro), the Premio a la Excelencia de la Sociedad Interamericana de Prensa (SIP) (twice), the Premio de Periodismo Ortega y Gasset, and the Premio al Mejor Documental in the second Jornada Iberoamericana de Televisión, celebrated in Cuba.



  • Daniel Saldaña París (born Mexico City, 1984) is an essayist, poet, and novelist. His first novel, Among Strange Victims, was published to critical acclaim in 2016. He has been a writer in residence at Union des Écrivaines et des Écrivains Québécois, the Omi International Arts Center, The Banff Centre, and The MacDowell Colony. His work has appeared in BOMB!GuernicaLitHub.comElectric LiteratureThe GuardianEl País, and on KCRW’s Unfictional, among others. In 2017, he was named by the Hay Festival as one of the best Latin-American writers under the age of 40.



  • Daniel Salinas Basave (Monterrey, 1974) is a reader, reporter, and storyteller of the Mexican border. He is the author of fourteen books, including short stories, essays, novels, and journalistic chronicles. Standout works include Días de whisky malo (UANL-Tusquets, 2014 Gilberto Owen National Short Story Prize and finalist for the 2017 Gabriel García Márquez Hispanoamerican Short Story Prize in Bogotá, Colombia); Dispárenme como a Blancornelas (Nitro Press-ISC, 2014 La Paz Short Story Prize); Vientos de Santa Ana (Literatura Random House 2016, finalist for the Mauricio Achar Prize); Bajo la luz de una estrella muerta (FOEM, 2015 Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz International Prize), and El Samurái de la Gráflex (Fondo de Cultura Económica, 2019). He started working as a reporter for El Norte de Monterrey and founded the periodical Frontera in Tijuana in 1999. He was sent as a reporter to Ground Zero in New York in 2001.


  • José Salvador Ruiz, a line-crossing writer of the noir border, is author of the essay collections Pájaros de cuentos. El cuento criminal bajacaliforniano y sus autores intelectuales (1982-2015) [Birds of stories: the Baja Californian crime story and its intellectual authors (1982-2015)] (2016), and Muertos en el tintero. La narrativa policiaca de Gabriel Trujillo Muñoz [Dead in the inkwell: the detective narrative of Gabriel Trujillo Muñoz] (2017). He is the author of the novels Nepantla P.I. (2014) and Hotel Chinesca (2018). He has published the books of short stories Hotel Kennedy (2016), Crímenes sueltos [Assorted crimes] (2017) Ni deis lugar al diablo  [Neither give place to the devil] (2017), and Lawless Border Towns (2018). He has been awarded the National Rafael Ramírez Heredia Short Story Prize, the State Literature Prize of Baja California in the categories of short story and essay, and the Regional City of La Paz Short Story Prize.


  • Daniel Salvo (Peru, 1967) started reading science fiction with pocket-sized books from Bruguera in the seventies. After reading the English-language classics, like Asimov and Clarke, he developed an interest in Peruvian science fiction, discovering authors like Clemente Palma and José B. Adolph. In 2002, he started publishing on the website (and now blog) Ciencia Ficción Perú with the purpose of promoting the genre and its Peruvian authors. He has published short stories on various websites and in electronic publications from Spain, Argentina, Peru, and the United States from the nineties to the present.

    The type of science fiction he writes is focused on the humanistic side, although he also writes in other currents such as the space opera. He published El primer peruano en el espacio, a compilation of his short stories published online, in 2016. His work has been included in two anthologies, Se vende Marcianos (2017) and Lo mejor de Arena (2018), both published by the Peruvian press Altazor. 



  • Photo by Álvaro Figueroa

    Mikeas Sánchez was born in Chiapas, Mexico in 1980. She writes in her native language, Zoque, spoken by about seventy thousand indigenous Mexicans in the southern state of Chiapas. In addition to her work as a poet, she is a translator and director of the Indigenous radio program XECOPA. She earned a master’s in education at the Autonomous University of Barcelona. She has published two books of poetry, produced several bilingual albums, and contributed to many anthologies of Indigenous poetry.


  • Mery Yolanda Sánchez (Guamo, Tolima, Colombia, 1956) has published the verse collections La ciudad que me habita (1989), Ritual para las noches (1997), and Dios sobra, estorba, as well as the anthologies Un día maíz (2010) and Rostro de tierra (2011).  Her poems, short stories, literary commentary, and book reviews have been included in a wide range of anthologies and literary journals in Colombia, Venezuela, Brazil, and Mexico. In both 1987 and 1994, she received honorable mentions in the Centro de Estudios Alejo Carpentier’s contest for unpublished short stories.  In 1998, she won the National Grant from the Ministry of Culture for her project “Poesía en Escena.”  In 2014, her text “El atajo” earned the Second National Prize for Short Novels from the Universidad Javeriana; it was later published in 2015.



  • Juan Guillermo Sánchez was born in Bakatá-Andes in 1980. He has published the poetry books Rio (2010) and Salvia (2014); the book of short stories Diarios de nada (2011); the novels Balada / Track (2012) and Elevador (2015); the anthology Indigenous Message of Water (2014); and the research project Memory and Invention in the Poetry of Humberto Ak'abal (2011). In 2016, he was awarded with the National Prize for Literature in Colombia, granted by the University of Antioquia. He is currently a professor at UNC-Asheville.


  • Feliciano Sánchez Chan is a poet and playwright. He collects stories related to Maya culture: tales of supernatural beings, stories of communities, creations of children; as a writer he has given us poetry, novels, and theater. He is a founding member of the National Association of Indigenous Language Writers. In 1993, he won first place in the Itzamná Prize for Maya Language Literature for his novel X-Marcela, and from 1997 to 2000 he was the coordinator of Publications and Diffusion at the House of Writers in Indigenous Languages of Mexico. He is the author of many books of prose, drama, and poetry, and he has coordinated and published his own work in anthologies of drama, short stories, and verse. His first verse collection is set in a dreamlike environment and intimately recreates the explanations provided in Maya cosmovision for the origin of man and his sacred invocations.



  • Photo: Esai June

    Jimmy Santiago Baca (Santa Fe, New Mexico, 1952) is of Spanish, Mexican, and Apache descent. Baca has published more than fifteen books of poetry, not including collections of short stories, novels, essays, a memoir, and a screenplay for the film Blood In and Blood Out (1993). His awards and recognitions include: a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts (1986), the Pushcart Prize (1987), the American Book Award (1988), the International Hispanic Heritage Award (1989), and the International Prize (2001). In 2004, he created Cedar Tree Inc., a non-profit foundation that provides education to disadvantaged communities. For more than thirty years he has led writing workshops in prisons, bookstores, and universities throughout the US and since 2017 he has been leading webinars for teachers and writers. Some of his book titles are: Immigrants in Our Own Land (1979); Martin & Meditations on the South Valley (1987); Black Mesa Poems (1989); Working in the Dark (1992); Set This Book on Fire! (2001); Healing Earthquakes (2001); A Place to Stand (2001), published in Spain as En suelo firme (2002); Winter Poems along the Rio Grande (2004); The Importance of a Piece of Paper (2004); Rita and Julia (2008); and A Glass of Water (2009).


  • Puerto Rican writer Mayra Santos-Febres is the author of some twenty books of poetry, fiction, and literary criticism, including the novels Sirena Selena, which was a finalist for the Rómulo Gallegos International Novel Prize, Our Lady of the Night, Any Wednesday I’m Yours, and, most recently, La amante de Gardel. A Guggenheim fellow, she is the recipient of the Juan Rulfo Short Story Prize and Puerto Rico’s National Literature Prize. Currently, Santos-Febres is a professor at the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras, where she directs the creative writing workshop and the Festival of the Word. In May, it was announced that she will be a writer-in-residence at the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Center Residency Program in Italy.


  • Puerto Rican Mayra Santos-Febres is the author of some twenty books of poetry, fiction, and literary criticism, including the novels Sirena Selena, which was a finalist for the Rómulo Gallegos International Novel Prize, Our Lady of the Night, Any Wednesday I’m Yours, and, most recently, La amante de Gardel. A Guggenheim fellow, she is the recipient of the Juan Rulfo prize for short story, and Puerto Rico’s National Literature Prize. Currently, Santos-Febres is a professor at the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras, where she directs the creative writing workshop and the Festival of the Word. In May it was announced that she will be a writer-in-residence at the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Center Residency Program in Italy.



  • Gina Saraceni (Caracas, 1966) is Associate Professor in the Department of Literary Studies of the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana. From 1994 to 2016, she was a tenured professor in the Department of Language and Literature and earned her Master’s degree in Latin American Literature and her Doctorate in Letters at the Universidad Simón Bolívar. Her research areas are critical and cultural theory, twentieth- and twenty-first-century Latin American literature, contemporary Venezuelan poetry, travel literature, fictions of memory, and biopolitics. She is editor of the journal Cuadernos de Literatura (Pontificia Universidad Javeriana). Her books include Rasgos comunes. Antología de la poesía venezolana del siglo XX (2019), La soberanía del defecto (2012), and Escribir hacia atrás. Herencia, lengua, memoria (2008). 
     



  • Gina Saraceni (Caracas, 1966) is Associate Professor in the Department of Literary Studies of the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana. From 1994 to 2016, she was a tenured professor in the Department of Language and Literature and earned her Master’s degree in Latin American Literature and her Doctorate in Letters at the Universidad Simón Bolívar. Her research areas are critical and cultural theory, twentieth- and twenty-first-century Latin American literature, contemporary Venezuelan poetry, travel literature, fictions of memory, and biopolitics. She is editor of the journal Cuadernos de Literatura (Pontificia Universidad Javeriana). Her books include Rasgos comunes. Antología de la poesía venezolana del siglo XX (2019), La soberanía del defecto (2012), and Escribir hacia atrás. Herencia, lengua, memoria (2008). 



  • Gabriel T. Saxton-Ruiz is Associate Professor of Spanish (Latin American Literature & Culture) at the University of the Incarnate Word.  Before coming to UIW, he was an Associate Professor of Spanish & Latin American Studies and Vice Chair of Humanistic Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. He received his BA in Spanish and French from Virginia Tech, and his MA and PhD in Modern Foreign Languages from the University of Tennessee. His research interests include twentieth and twenty-first-century Latin American literature, popular culture studies, cultural gastronomy and representations of violence in various types of cultural productions. He is the author of Forasteros en tierra extraña (2012). Saxton-Ruiz is also the Editor-in-Chief of Stories From Peru, an online magazine of Peruvian literature in translation into English. His scholarly articles and translations have appeared in diverse publications in the UK, USA, Cuba and Peru including Words Without Borders, Revista Hiedra and Revista Conjunto-Casa de las Américas.  



  • Lucina Schell works in international rights for the University of Chicago Press and is founding editor of Reading in Translation. She is a member of the Third Coast Translators Collective, and translates poetry from the Spanish. Recent translations include So That Something Remains Lit by Daiana Henderson (Cardboard House Press DRONE Chapbook Series, 2018) and Vision of the Children of Evil by Miguel Ángel Bustos (co•im•press, 2018).  



  • Lawrence Schimel (New York, 1971) is a full-time author, writing in both Spanish and English, who has published over one hundred books in a wide range of genres, including fiction, poetry, graphic novels, and children's literature. He is also a prolific literary translator. Recent translations include the novels The Wild Book by Juan Villoro (Restless Books) and La Bastarda by Trifonia Melibea Obono (The Feminist Press in the US/Modjaji Books in South Africa), the graphic novel of Jesús Carrasco's Out in the Open (SelfMadeHero), and poetry collections Nothing is Lost: Selected Poems by Jordi Doce (Shearsman), Dangerous Matter by Garbiela Cantú Westendarp (Literal Publishing), and Destruction of the Lover by Luis Panini (Pleaides Press, forthcoming 2019). He lives in Madrid, Spain.



  • Michael Schuessler is an independent scholar and professor of Humanities at Mexico’s Metropolitan Autonomous University. He is the author of the biographies La undécima musa: Guadalupe Amor [The eleventh muse: Guadalupe Amor] (1995), El universo de sor Juana [Sor Juana’s universe] (1995), and Elenísima: ingenio y figura de Elena Poniatowska (2003), which was written in collaboration with Poniatowska and was later published in English by the University of Arizona Press as Elena Poniatowska: an Intimate Biography. His most recent book is Perdidos en la traducción: cinco extranjeros ilustres en el México del siglo XX [Lost in translation: five illustrious foreigners in 20th-century Mexico].



  • Marisol Schulz Manaut has directed the Guadalajara International Book Fair since April 2013. In 2010, she initiated the LéaLA project, establishing a book fair also organized by the Universidad de Guadalajara in Los Angeles. Before that, she worked for Grupo Santillana in the direction of their Alfaguara and Taurus imprints. She studied history at the National Autonomous University of Mexico.



  • Samanta Schweblin is the author of the short story collections El núcleo del disturbioPájaros en la boca, and Siete casas vacías, as well as the novels Distancia de rescate and Kentukis. She has won numerous prestigious awards, including the Juan Rulfo Story Prize, and the English-language translation of Distancia de rescate by Megan McDowell, titled Fever Dream, was longlisted for the Man Booker International Prize. Her work has been translated into over twenty languages, and in 2017 she was selected by Granta as one of the twenty-two best Spanish-language writers under the age of 35. She is originally from Buenos Aires and she now lives in Berlin.



  • Alejandro Sebastiani Verlezza (Caracas, 1982) is a poet and essayist who sometimes strays into visual arts. He earned his degree and is now a professor at the School of Letters of the Central University of Venezuela. He graduated from the Liberal Studies program of the Universidad del Valle San Francisco in 2015. He is currently earning a master's degree in Literary Studies from the UCV. He has published a chapbook, Posdatas (El Pez Soluble, 2009), the diary Derivas (bid & co, 2013), and the verse collection Canción de la encrucijada (Editorial Eclepsidra, 2016). His work has been included in Voces nuevas 2005-2006 (Celarg, narrative) and Voces nuevas 2006-2007 (Celarg, essay) and in 102 Poetas. Jamming (OT Editores, 2014) and Tiempos grotescos (UNAM, Mexico, 2015). Along with Adalber Salas Hernández, he has prepared two anthologies: Tramas cruzadas, destinos comunes (Común Presencia Editores, Bogotá, 2013) and Destinos portátiles (Vallejo & Co, Lima, 2015). 


  • Jarol Segura Rivera, Nasö Bröran, Costa Rica. He was born in 1978 in the San Isidro, Pérez Zeledón. Since the age of fifteen he has been an activist involved in the struggles of Costa Rica’s Indigenous Peoples. He began to write poetry at the same age. He studied at the CINDEA Satellite campus in San Antonio. He currently works for the Ministry of Public Education and is involved with the literary magazine Los come libros.



  • Photo: Lovisa Karlsson

    Gianfranco Selgas (Caracas, 1988) is a PhD candidate in Spanish specializing in Latin American Literature and Culture at Stockholm University. He is assistant editor of Iberoamericana. Nordic Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Studies.


  • Enrique Serna began his career as a writer for popular Mexican soap operas (telenovelas) in the 1990s.  He moved on to publish several novels, among them El miedo a los animales, El seductor de la patria (Mazatlán Prize), Ángeles del abismo (Colima Prize), and La sangre erguida (Antonin Artaud Prize); as well as collections of short stories such as Amores de segunda mano (where “The Last Visit” is found).  Gabriel García Márquez called Serna one of Mexico’s best short-story writers.  Additionally, the author has published three books of essays and writes a monthly article for the literary magazine, Letras libres.


  • Maureen Shaughnessy’s translation of Hebe Uhart’s selected stories, The Scent of Buenos Aires (Archipelago Books, 2019) was shortlisted for the 2020 PEN Translation Prize. Her translations have been published by AGNI, The Antioch Review, Asymptote, Brick, The Paris Review, Words Without Borders, and World Literature Today. She lives and works in Bariloche, Argentina.



  • David Shook is a poet, translator, and editor who divides their time between Northern California and Northern Iraq. They have translated more than 15 books from Spanish, including work by Mario Bellatin, Tedi López Mills, Jorge Eduardo Eielson, and Pablo Jofré. Since they founded the nonprofit publishing house Phoneme Media in 2013 they have edited translations from 26 languages into English, including the first ever book-length translations from Lingala and Uyghur. A translation of their first collection, Our Obsidian Tongues (2013) was just published in Chile by Los Perros Románticos (tr. Pablo Jofré) as Lenguas de obsidiana, and they are finishing their second collection, written in Spanish, Atlas estelar
     


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