Three Poems

Three Poems

 

Photo: Tim Mossholder, Unsplash.

Love Might Arrive, Later

We’ve been through that phase when the body
begins to remember:
one of us came back from a trip and
we embraced in silence on the couch
for a long time, no need for words,
our bodies moving on their own
kisses and running to the bedroom
bread with butter,
later, the sharing of experiences,
later, the clumsy hugs, later
disrupted sleep, later
the days to come,
later, the pain as well,
later.

 

The Logic of Accidents

If I could understand the order
that leads to accidents,
the loss of what’s given, the unequal
distribution of anguish,
writing a word like ansia,
desiring, longing for, urgently needing,
but there’s no translation
there’s no logic
except in the body.

 

All Leakage is an Illusion

The electric bill
spiked like never before
and I ask myself
if something could be wrong with the installation
or maybe there’s a mismatch in the meter.
The meter
isn’t aligned with reality.
The meter
questions the parameters of my reality.
In a leakage, there’s so much electricity
it breaks from the circuit.
In a leakage, there’s so much electricity
it escapes from the body
and that’s why it disperses.
There’s not much else to say
the balance I need has been truncated.
I want to date an electrician
but I cannot attract
without a center of gravity.  

Translated by Maureen Shaughnessy

Languages

Mario Bellatin
Number 13

In our thirteenth issue, we feature two innovative, hard-to-define figures of Latin American letters: from the present, Mexican writer Mario Bellatin, and from the past, Chilean writer Juan Emar. Together with these authors, we highlight Latin American theatre for the first time with a script by Ramón Griffero, Nahuatl-language poetry by Martín Tonalmeyotl, plus interviews, book reviews, exclusive previews, and more from writers including Rosario Castellanos, César Aira, and Salgado Maranhão.

Table of Contents

Editor's Note

Featured Author: Mario Bellatin

Dossier: Juan Emar

Interviews

Fiction

Brazilian Literature

Indigenous Literature

Theatre

Poetry

Translation Previews and New Releases

On Translation

Nota Bene