Poetics

 

Colombian poet Juan Manuel Roca. Photo: Carlos Mario Lema.

After writing on paper the word coyote
You must watch out that the meat-craving word
Does not take over the page,
Does not manage to hide
Behind the word jacaranda
To wait for the word hare to pass by
And then tear it apart.
In order to prevent it,
To sound the alarm
When the coyote stealthily
Prepares its ambush,
Some old masters
Who know the spells of language
Recommend tracing the word match
Rubbing it against the word stone
And lighting up the word fire
To scare it away.
There is no coyote or jackal, no hyena or jaguar,
No puma or wolf thar won't flee
When fire converses with air.

Translated by Laura Chalar

Languages

LALT No. 4
Number 4

The fourth issue of LALT highlights underrepresented but deserving voices from across Latin America, with a focus on women writers as well as special sections dedicated to genre-bending science fiction, indigenous-language poetry and prose, and the essential relationship between author and translator.

Table of Contents

Editor's Note

Fiction

Short Fiction from Peru

Bogotá39

Translation Previews and New Releases

Poetry

Essays

Latin American Science Fiction

Indigenous Literature

Dossier: Five Women Writers in Translation

Interviews

Dossier: Colombian Poetry

Nota Bene